Archive for 2010

Oct 12

Ten Years Later: Remembering USS Cole

Tuesday, October 12, 2010 8:55 AM

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Ten years ago, Secretary of the Navy Richard Danzig reflected on the terrorist attack on the USS Cole. Today we remember and honor the crew with his words, written in his Proceedings magazine article, “America Loves Its Citizens”: “Mr. Secretary, we will save this ship. We will repair this ship. We will take this ship home, and we will sail this ship again to sea.” One of the reasons that I love America is because it loves its citizens. In other times, and on this very day in other places, people are regarded as means and not ends, as fodder,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 12

Breaking the Mold: The Ben Cloud Story

Tuesday, October 12, 2010 12:01 AM

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Flying over Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War in an RF-8 Crusader, Ben Cloud never pondered his status as an officer of African American and Native American descent. His main concern was getting good photos of the Ho Chi Minh trail, and surviving the antiaircraft fire he received on every mission. Cloud came from a middle class family from San Diego, Calif., and entered the Naval Aviation Cadet program at the onset of the Korean War. He later was selected to fly one of the hottest planes of the period, the F9F Panther. By 1971 his career was on a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 11

The Battle of Valcour Island 11 October 1776

Monday, October 11, 2010 12:01 AM

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October 11th is the anniversary of the most important naval battle of the American Revolution. It was fought on a fresh-water lake (Lake Champlain) by an American force consisting of fifteen small vessels, commanded by an army general, Benedict Arnold, who became America’s most notorious traitor. Opposing it was a larger British flotilla, firing a weight of metal almost twice that of the Americans. Not surprising, therefore, the British destroyed the American fleet and decisively won the battle of Valcour Island. Why then is it such an important battle? Because to deal with the threat posed by this rag-tag American… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 10

Commitment and Perseverance: Float plane pilots Ens. Harvey P. Jolly and Lt (jg) Robert L. Dana.

Sunday, October 10, 2010 12:01 AM

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Of the many dangerous and unglamorous assignments during World War II, flying single-engine float planes as part of an aviation detachment in a cruiser was particularly grueling duty. Tasked with scouting, search & rescue and gunfire spotting missions, the hours were long – especially in an open cockpit – the task technically complicated and the mission critical. It was also extremely dangerous, as pilots and support crew struggled with salt corrosion, lack of spare parts, tricky water landings and high performance enemy fighters. The wartime exploits of two pilots of the float plane detachment in light cruiser Biloxi (CL 80)… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 9

Irregular Warfare and the Vandalia expedition in Fiji, 1859

Saturday, October 9, 2010 6:00 AM

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Irregular operations have a long history in the U.S. Navy. From cutting out expeditions against West Indian privateers in the 1790s, the sailing Navy’s version of visit-board-and-search operations off Tripoli in 1801 or skirmishes against rioters or Chinese troops during the Taiping rebellion in 1855, American Sailors were comfortable conducting irregular or ad hoc combat operations ashore. Under the command of skilled officers and experienced chief petty officers, veteran Sailors put the mission first, accomplishing remarkable feats at a then acceptable cost in lives. One of many examples took place in the South Pacific in the 1850s, an area of… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 9

A Guadalcanal Fighter Pilot: Lieutenant (jg) Melvin C. Roach

Saturday, October 9, 2010 6:00 AM

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VF-5 provided much needed air cover for the 1st Marines on Guadalcanal. In the late afternoon of 9 October 1942, eleven of their F4F fighters lifted off from Henderson Field on Guadalcanal and headed west. They were acting as escorts for Navy and Marine SBD dive bombers and TBF torpedo planes sent out against an incoming Japanese “Tokyo Express” force, composed of the seaplane carrier Nisshin and five destroyers, which was bringing in troops, supplies, and heavy weapons to Guadalcanal. It was 1800 and the sun was almost touching the water when the fighting began. While the SBDs and TBFs… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 8

Trailer to “Wings for the Navy…the Birth of Naval Aviation”

Friday, October 8, 2010 12:27 PM

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This is a trailer for the 25 minute video “Wings for the Navy …the Birth of Naval Aviation” which is being prepared for next year’s Centennial of Naval Aviation.

 
Oct 7

U.S. Naval Institute Birthday: October 9,1873

Thursday, October 7, 2010 8:19 AM

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Congratulations to the U.S. Naval Institute on reaching its 137th year! Read what Rear Admiral Bradley A. Fiske had to say about the Naval Institute in Proceedings, Vol. 45 No. 192, February 1919: Without some such stimulus as the Institute, the navy would be less like a pro­fession and more like a trade; we would be less like artists, and more like artisans; we would become too practical and narrow; we would have no broad vision of the navy as a whole. Each one of us would regard his own special task as the only thing that concerned him, and… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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