Archive for March, 2012

Mar 27

USS Constellation Aids Victims of Irish Famine

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 1:47 PM

The USS Constellation loading famine relief supplies for Ireland at the New York Navy Yard, in March 1880.

March 27th, 1880

The USS Constellation departs from New York with food for famine victims in Ireland

  The USS Constellation, a frigate first launched in 1797, held a long naval career, which spanned over the length of a century, and exemplified both the military and humanitarian aspects of the U. S. Navy. Towards the end of her career, the Constellation was charged with the duty of bringing aid to the victims of the ongoing famine in Ireland. In this duty, and in several others undertaken at the same point in her career, the Constellation served as an ambassador of sorts for the United States abroad, advancing American relations with other nations. A brief excerpt of her career, from an artical by Ruby Duval in the December 1935 issue of Proceedings documents some of the many duties which made the Constellation such an ambassador.

The Constellation was placed out of commission until 1855 when, after rebuilding at the Norfolk Navy Yard, she was ordered to the Mediterranean to join the squadron of Commodore Breese. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 25

Beginning of Naval Aviation

Sunday, March 25, 2012 1:00 AM

March 25th, 1898

Beginning of the Navy’s Interest in Aviation

In 1898, Theodore Roosevelt, then Assistant Secretary of the Navy, ushered in the beginning of Naval Aviation, with a proposal that the Navy investigate Samuel Langley’s flying machine for military purposes. However, as an article printed in the January 1971 issue of Proceedings notes, a long time passed between Roosevelt’s proposal and the first use of planes by the Navy. The article excerpted below, written by Thomas Ray, documents the first application of Roosevelt’s proposal, beginning in 1910.

Prior to September 1910—when the Navy Department appointed an officer to keep abreast of world aviation developments—the U. S. Navy had manifested little interest in aviation except to send token representation to certain aeronautical test flights and meets. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 20

Comissioning of the Navy’s First Aircraft Carrier

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 1:00 AM

March 20th, 1922

USS Jupiter is recommissioned as USS Langley

90 years ago, the U. S. Navy’s first aircraft carrier, the USS Langley was commissioned, after having been converted from a collier, the USS Jupiter. Before this conversion, the USS Jupiter was already notable, as the first large ship in the world equipped with an electric drive, a quality which made her transformation into the Navy’s first aircraft carrier a fitting one. The November 1922 issue of Proceedings recounts this conversion in its Professional Notes, and gives a detailed account of the USS Langley‘s many new and innovative features which would allow it to carry and support the Navy’s aircraft.

The U. S. S. Langley is now on her shakedown cruise preparatory to taking her place in the fleet as the Navy’s first airplane carrier. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 17

USS Holland (SS-1) makes her first successful submerged run: 17 March 1898

Saturday, March 17, 2012 1:00 AM

On St. Patrick’s Day, 1898, the USS Holland (SS-1) made her first successful submerged run. Irish-born American schoolteacher and inventor, John Phillip Holland (1842-1914) is often considered the man who contributed most to the development of the submarine.

 

John Holland

The Story of the Holland Submarine by Richard Knowles Morris was told in the January 1960 issue of Proceedings magazine:

 

The story of SS-l Holland is the story of the birth of the submarine fleet of the United States Navy. Launched 17 May 1897, at Lewis Nixon’s Crescent Shipyard, Elizabethport, New Jersey, the 53-foot 4-inch submersible was the sixth completed boat and at least the ninth important design of the Irish­born American schoolteacher and inventor, John Philip Holland (1842-1914). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 7

First Women Assigned to a Combat Ship

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 1:00 AM

March 7th, 1994

The U. S. Navy issues first orders for women aboard a combat ship: the USS Eisenhower (CVN-69)

The U. S. Navy issued the first set of orders to women for duty aboard a combat ship, the USS Eisenhower (CVN-69) on March 7, 1994. 

By June 25th, when this photo of a watertight door proudly labeled “FEMALE OFFICERS COUNTRY” was snapped as ‘A Sign of the Times’ eighty-seven women were aboard the ship as crew members, and approximately 500 women were expected aboard (as ship’s crew or members of an embarked air wing) by the following October for the next scheduled deployment.