Archive for July, 2012

Jul 26

Naval Reserves in the Korean War

Thursday, July 26, 2012 3:21 PM


On July 27, 1953, the Korean War Armistice Agreement was signed at Panmunjon, Korea, and the Korean cease-fire went into effect at 10:00 PM, ending three years of combat. The following article, published in the July 1952 issue of Proceedings, gives an account of what it was like to be a part of a Naval reserve group in the Korean war. STANDBY SQUADRON By LIEUTENANT W. H. VERNOR, JR., U. S. Naval Reserve   IF you’ve ever driven between the Texas cities of Fort Worth and Dallas on a Sunday morning, chances are you’ve seen some of the rugged, old Navy… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 24

Operation Forager

Tuesday, July 24, 2012 10:17 AM


On July 24, 1944, the Naval Task Force landed Marines on Tinian. After victory in the Battle of Saipan from June 15 to July 9, Tinian, which was 3.5 miles south of Saipan, was the next logical step in the U.S. strategy of island hopping. Tinian was Phase III of Operation Forager, which began with the capture of Saipan (Phase I) and the battle for the liberation of Guam (II), which was raging even as the Marines were approaching Tinian. Submarines were used to destroy enemy forces approaching the islands , clearing the way for the beach landing. The following… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 23

Richard Dale Strikes Barbary Pirates

Monday, July 23, 2012 9:47 AM


July 23, 1801 Commodore Richard Dale blockades Tripoli in America’s first foreign war. In the December 1937 issue of Proceedings, Lieutenant Felix Howland wrote about the American blockade of Tripoli during 1801 to 1802, examining the popular conception that the blockade had been a success. Howland’s article highlighted the necessity of vigilantly maintaining the blockade, and emphasized the implications of failing to do so: On May 14, 1801, Tripoli declared war against the United States. Shortly thereafter an American squadron under the command of Commodore Richard Dale appeared in the Mediterranean, and on July 23, 1801, Mr. William Eaton, the… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 23

Sealab I

Monday, July 23, 2012 9:36 AM


Sealab I was the first experimental underwater habitat developed by the Navy to research the psychological and physiological strain of extended periods spent living and working underwater. Two more Sealab experiments followed the first, providing information that helped advance the science of deep sea diving and rescue. The following article, published in the February 1965 issue of Proceedings, discusses the goals of Sealab 1, and the results of the ten day experiment. SEALAB I by Lieutenant Commander Don Groves, U.S. Naval Reserve An odd looking, 40-foot vessel, equipped with pontoon-shaped appendages, was launched from the navy’s oceanographic research tower, Argus Island, on… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 18

John Paul Jones Remembered

Wednesday, July 18, 2012 8:15 AM


The United State’s first well-known naval fighter died 220 years ago, on July 18, 1792. Originally published in the July 1947 issue of Proceedings to mark the bicentennial of his birth, the following article outlines the life of John Paul Jones and his contributions to the Navy. THE BICENTENNIAL OF JOHN PAUL JONES By DR. LINCOLN LORENZ VIEWED from the bicentennial of his birth, John Paul Jones has even greater eminence now as a leader of the American Navy at its beginning than he won at the time of his incomparable triumph in the battle of the Bonhomme Richard with… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 13

Exploring The Antarctic

Friday, July 13, 2012 9:52 AM


On July 13, 1939, RADM Richard Byrd was appointed as commanding officer of the 1939-1941 Antarctic exploration. This was Byrd’s third Antarctic expedition, and the first one that had the official backing of the U.S. Government. In honor of his work, and the work done by many others who braved the cold and ice, here is a brief history of American Antarctic exploration, originally published in the November 1961 issue of Proceedings. Charting of an Unknown Land: The Antarctic Continent By SCOT MAcDONALD There is a suspicion among some cartographers that Christopher Columbus carried with him on his first trip… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 3

Adventures of Old Glory

Tuesday, July 3, 2012 12:46 PM


A brief American flag history from 1777-1927 is presented in celebration of Independence Day. In the March 1927 issue of Proceedings, an article was published with a chronology of some “firsts” for the American flag. Another “first” not included in the following article: On July 4, 1777, John Paul Jones and the crew of the Sloop-of-War Ranger hoisted the first “Stars and Stripes” flag to be flown on board a continental warship. Adventures 0f “Old Glory” By William E. Beard The flag of the United States, adopted June 14, 1777, was thereafter in the Revolution thirteen stars and thirteen stripes. The War… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 1

Consolidation of the Lighthouse Service with the Coast Guard: July 1, 1939

Sunday, July 1, 2012 1:00 AM


CONSOLIDATION OF THE LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE WITH THE COAST GUARD (from USNI Proceedings Vol 66/No1/Whole No 443) By ROBERT H. MACY ON JULY 1, 1939, two of the oldest government maritime services were combined-the U. S. Coast Guard and the U. S. Lighthouse Service. The former has been under the Treasury Department and the latter in recent years was a bureau of the Department of Commerce. Officially, this merger is part of the President’s Reorganization Plan No. II, promulgated under the Reorganization Act of 1939 (Public No. 19, 76th Congress). Under this Act, “the duties, responsibilities, and functions of the Commissioner… Read the rest of this entry »