Aug 15

Welcome USS John Paul Jones and USS Preble

Friday, August 15, 2014 11:00 AM

Rear Adm. Rick Williams

Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

 

Rear Adm. Rick WilliamsThis week historic Pearl Harbor welcomes two new warships to our waterfront: USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) and USS Preble (DDG 88).

Each ship is named for a founder of the U.S. Navy – leaders who made their mark in the Revolutionary War, especially in the case of Jones, and – in Preble’s case – in the war against Barbary pirates.

On the deck of the captured Serapis, John Paul Jones salutes the Bon Homme Richard as it sinks with its colors still flying. (Taken from a print in the John Paul Jones house at Portsmouth)

On the deck of the captured Serapis, John Paul Jones salutes the Bon Homme Richard as it sinks with its colors still flying. (Taken from a print in the John Paul Jones house at Portsmouth)

Two hundred and thirty eight years ago this month, in August of 1776, John Paul Jones was temporarily promoted to Captain and assumed command of the sloop Providence.

He sailed from the Delaware with orders to “cruise against the enemy” off the northeast coast of America, where he captured supply ships, preventing them from reaching the British.

In the next three years he raided off the coast of England, rescued American prisoners of war and defeated enemy ships in some of the most memorable battles in U.S. Navy history.

More than 150 years ago, James Fennimore Cooper said in a Jones biography:

“There can be no question that Paul Jones was a great man … all the cruises of the man indicated forethought, intrepidity, and resources. Certainly, no sea captain under the American flag, Preble excepted, has ever yet equaled him, in these particulars.”

Commodore Edward Preble NHHC

Commodore Edward Preble
NHHC

If John Paul Jones is considered one of the fathers of the Navy, Commodore Edward Preble must be considered another of our founders.

Like Jones, Preble fought with fearless determination.

Two hundred and eleven years ago this month, in August 1803, he sailed the American frigate USS Constitution toward the Mediterranean.

Aboard Constitution and with Marines at his side, Preble led Jefferson’s Navy into Tripoli. He sailed with young men who would become captains in the War of 1812 – Stephen Decatur, James Lawrence, Isaac Hull and David Porter.

Preble defeated the Barbary pirates and established some of the foundations for the modern Navy and demonstrated our nation’s firm commitment to the rescue and return of our prisoners of war.

Between Jones and Preble, there have been ten United States ships named for these great heroes of our Navy. These namesake ships – most of them destroyers – have fought in the Mexican-American war, Civil War, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, Vietnam and in the Middle East.

It is a privilege to welcome USS John Paul Jones and USS Preble to Hawaii. I know you will bring advanced capabilities in radar and weapon systems, including Aegis ballistic missile defense and Navy Integrated Fires, and I’m grateful you’re joining our team. You’ll find a supportive family and many friends at DESRON 31 and MIDPAC. You’ll join other ships with proud namesakes and outstanding records of achievement.

Happily, many of the Sailors and families already serving here in Hawaii will be able to join shipmates aboard one of these fine warships arriving this week.

To USS Preble and USS John Paul Jones: Welcome Aboard and Aloha!

photojjjj

 

 

 
Jan 24

John Paul Jones Comes Home

Friday, January 24, 2014 1:00 PM
Annapolis, Md. (May 27, 2005) - Father of the U.S. Navy, John Paul Jones, is entombed at the U.S. Naval Academy and is guarded by Midshipman 24-hours a day, three hundred sixty five days a year. Jones is forever immortalized by uttering the words, "I have not yet begun to fight", during the battle between USS Bonhomme Richard and HMS Serapis, off the coast of England in 1779. Jones was buried in a pauper's grave in Paris. More than a century later, his remains were returned to the United States and placed at the academy as a national shrine. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Kevin H. Tierney (RELEASED)

Annapolis, Md. (May 27, 2005) – Father of the U.S. Navy, John Paul Jones, is entombed at the U.S. Naval Academy and is guarded by Midshipman 24-hours a day, three hundred sixty five days a year. Jones is forever immortalized by uttering the words, “I have not yet begun to fight”, during the battle between USS Bonhomme Richard and HMS Serapis, off the coast of England in 1779. Jones was buried in a pauper’s grave in Paris. More than a century later, his remains were returned to the United States and placed at the academy as a national shrine. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 1st Class Kevin H. Tierney (RELEASED)

It is possible that the axiom “all good things come to those who wait” could not be more applicable to any historic Navy figure than John Paul Jones, a Scotland-born Sailor who rose to fame as a captain in the Continental Navy of the United States, widely considered one of the founders of the U.S. Navy.

After languishing for 113 years in a virtually unmarked grave paved over by a Paris laundry, this legendary naval leader was found, reclaimed by the U.S., and now lays in an ornate sarcophagus styled after French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte.

C’est la vie!

Jones’ crypt is not as large as the famed French emperor, but they share the same center-placed sarcophagus surrounded on the perimeter by marble columns.

Designed by Beaux Arts architect Whitney Warren, the French sculptor Sylvain Salieres crafted the sarcophagus and columns out of black and white Great Pyrenees marble. The top is garnished with garlands of bronze sea plants, while the sarcophagus itself is held aloft on the backs of four bronze dolphins.

Surrounding the sarcophagus, etched in the marble floor and then inset in brass, are the names of the Continental Navy ships commanded by Jones during the American Revolution: Providence, Alfred, Ranger, Bonhomme Richard, Serapis, Alliance and Ariel.

In between the eight columns that form the perimeter of the crypt are American national ensigns (flags) and Union Jacks.

In the periphery of the circular space surrounding the sarcophagus are niches displaying historic objects related to Jones’ life and naval career, which include an original marble copy of the Houdon portrait bust, a gold medal awarded to Jones by Congress in 1787, the gold-hilted presentation sword given to Jones by Louis XVI of France, and Jones’ commission as captain, Continental (U.S.) Navy, signed by John Hancock.

And also inlaid in brass is this inscription:

 

JOHN PAUL JONES, 1747-1792; U.S. NAVY, 1775-1783.

HE GAVE OUR NAVY ITS EARLIEST TRADITIONS OF HEROISM AND VICTORY.

ERECTED BY THE CONGRESS, A.D. 1912.

 John Paul Jones Tomb Courtesy United States Naval Academy flickr

Perhaps Congress giving itself credit for the sarcophagus might have been a bit overreaching. But there is a plaque that does give nod to the man who brought John Paul Jones home: Brevet Gen. Horace Porter, a United States Military Academy at West Point graduate and close friend of Ulysses Grant. When work on Grant’s Tomb stopped due to lack of money, it was Porter who kept the project rolling with his fundraising efforts. A large audience was in attendance when the monument on Riverside Drive in New York was dedicated April 27, 1897.

And so with work finished on Grant’s Tomb, Porter jumped into a similar mission when he was appointed as ambassador to France in 1897: Find and bring back the body of naval hero John Paul Jones.

Porter spent the next six years researching and funding the investigation to determine where Jones had been buried. Records revealed Jones was likely buried in the Saint Louis Cemetery for Foreign Protestants, but it had been paved over.

Congress agreed to pay $35,000 for the excavation, but rather than waiting for the funds to be released, Porter paid for the work himself. The body was found almost perfectly preserved in an alcohol-filled lead coffin within a wooden coffin. That was done because when he died in 1792 Jones’ friends believed the U.S. would eventually bring the body back to America.

By the time Porter was convinced through autopsy and other records that he had found John Paul Jones, it was 1905. Naval enthusiast President Theodore Roosevelt used repatriating Jones’ remains as an opportunity to show off his growing naval power.

On July 6, 1905, to commemorate the 158th year of Jones’ birth, his remains were led by military escort through the streets of Paris and taken by torpedo boat to USS Brooklyn which, along with a squadron of warships, brought Jones’ body back to America, 113 years after his death.

Roosevelt deemed Jones’ final resting place to be the U.S. Naval Academy’s chapel which was being built on its Annapolis, Md., campus. Jones’ body was placed in a temporary vault until his final crypt was finished.

April 24, 1906 was chosen for the formal commemorative exercises of John Paul Jones’ re-internment because it was the anniversary of Jones’ famous 1778 capture of the British warship Drake.

Held at the Naval Academy, Roosevelt presided over the ceremony, using it as an opportunity to not only recognize the “memory of the dead hero” whose “indomitable determination and dauntless scorn of death” should be emulated by future naval officers, but also to push his agenda on the need to build ships in time of peace to prepare for future need.

He evoked the image of the British burning Washington, D.C. during the War of 1812 as he thundered: “The sin of the invaders in burning the buildings is trivial compared with the sin of our own people in failing to make ready an adequate force to defeat the attempt.”

In case that message didn’t get through, he added “Let us remember our own shortcomings and see to it that the men in public life today are not permitted to bring about a state of things by which we should in effect invite a repetition of such a humiliation.”

After this ceremony, Jones was placed back into the vault to await the designing and sculpting of his final resting place. During this period of time, Roosevelt completed building his Great White Fleet, launched it on its 2-year circumnavigation of the world, and oversaw the building and completion of the Panama Canal and left office.

Finally, on Jan. 26, 1913, John Paul Jones was entombed within the 21-ton ornate marble and bronze sarcophagus. Considered a pirate by the British, a rogue by the Russians, and nearly forgotten by America, John Paul Jones had risen yet again from obscurity to lay in splendor for eternity as the Sailor who gave the modern U.S. Navy many of its traditions.

John Paul Jones Courtesy United States Naval Academy

 
Dec 3

Lt. John Paul Jones raised 1st American flag over U.S. vessel

Tuesday, December 3, 2013 8:00 AM

 

Continental Navy Lt. John Paul Jones was the first to raise the first flag representing America. Naval History and Heritage Command photo

Continental Navy Lt. John Paul Jones was the first to raise the first flag representing America. Naval History and Heritage Command photo

 

By Naval History and Heritage Command

Today marks the 238th anniversary when on Dec. 3, 1775, Lt. John Paul Jones, having just received his first commission from the Continental Congress, hoisted the Grand Union Flag in Philadelphia Harbor aboard Alfred. It was the first time the American flag was raised over an American naval vessel and marked the beginning of a number of traditions related to the raising of the flag the Navy observes to this day.

No ship of the Navy shall dip the national ensign unless in return for such compliment. (US NavyRegulations, Chapter 12, section 1263)
The Naval Ceremonies, Customs, and Traditions states that historically, lowering any flag meant submission. This is why no U.S. Navy warship dips its colors first, because warships from any nation commonly do not dip their colors but maintain an “alert” status, unless the traditional salute is rendered first commonly from a small craft, yacht or merchant vessel.

U.S. Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Chosin (CG-65) render passing honors to the Canadian navy destroyer HMCS Algonquin and HMCS Whitehorse during the 2010 International Fleet Week at Victoria, British Columbia. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class James Mitchell)

U.S. Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Chosin (CG-65) render passing honors to the Canadian navy destroyer HMCS Algonquin and HMCS Whitehorse during the 2010 International Fleet Week at Victoria, British Columbia.
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class James Mitchell)

Instead, honor is accorded to passing ships with passing honors. Passing honors are ordered by ships and boats when vessels pass or are passed close aboard (600 yards). Such honors are exchanged between ships of the U.S. Navy, between ships of the Navy and the Coast Guard, and between U.S. and most foreign navy ships passing close aboard. “Attention” is sounded, and the hand salute is rendered by all persons in view on deck.

Each person in the naval service, upon coming on board a ship of the Navy, shall salute the national ensign.” (US Navy Regulations, Chapter 12, section 1207)
The flag is displayed on every ship at the place of honor, close to the stern, which is the most visible place of honor on a ship. Every Sailor salutes the flag first before coming aboard then salutes the officer. When going ashore, Sailors salute the flag last after saluting the officer. Once the flag is within six paces of a Sailor, the salute is held until six paces after. According to the book Naval Ceremonies, Customs, and Traditions, the salute dates back to the days when it was customary for knights to lift their visors as a gesture of respect to one who held higher rank.

The book says, “Today, the personal salute is a significant military gesture. It is the act of military and naval men looking into the eyes of another companion in arms, and by a proper gesture of the hand, paying due respect to the uniform of another defender of the Republic,”

In keeping with Navy regs, a Sailor salutes the flag prior to going aboard USS Stetham (DDG 63) stationed in Japan in 2010. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jennifer A. Villalovo

In keeping with Navy regs, a Sailor salutes the flag prior to going aboard USS Stetham (DDG 63) stationed in Japan in 2010.
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jennifer A. Villalovo

The ceremonial hoisting and lowering of the national ensign at 0800 and sunset at a naval command ashore or aboard a ship of the Navy not underway shall be known as morning and evening colors, respectively.(US Navy Regulations, Chapter 12, section 1206)

 At 8 a.m. every morning, ships and Navy installations play the national anthem and raise the colors. Cars stop at the gates as they are entering, departing or parking. People stop walking and stand at attention. Everyone stops talking. Calls are ended. Cell phones are silenced. At dusk the same respect is repeated. It is a tradition taken from America’s British ancestry to show allegiance to the flag.

Sailors raise an American flag during Veterans Day morning colors aboard the amphibious dock landing ship Harpers Ferry (LSD-49). U.S. Navy file photo

Sailors raise an American flag during Veterans Day morning colors aboard the amphibious dock landing ship Harpers Ferry (LSD-49).
U.S. Navy file photo

As the Naval Telecommunications Procedure states, the flag “represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing” and is “universally representative of the principles of justice, liberty, and democracy enjoyed by the people of the United States.”

So the next time you stop for morning or evening colors, cross a ship’s quarterdeck or render passing honors, remember the father of our Navy and this moment in history that is acted on daily by globally deployed naval forces.

 

 

 Factoids: Did you know?

1. John Paul Jones left a very successful and lucrative career on slave ships because he found the cruelty of slavery disturbing and wanted no part of it. He left Scotland and came to the colonies writing that he came to, “…hoist the flag of Freedom.” The Continental Congress approved of his actions and quickly granted him a commission. 

John Paul Jones later wrote in 1779, “It is this day four years since I had the honor to receive my first Commission as the Senior of the first Lieutenants in the Navy. . . I hoisted with my own hands the Flag of Freedom the first time that it was displayed on bard the Alfred on the Delaware.

2. Our stripes were there, but not yet our stars. At just 13 colonies, the novice nation had one idea in mind: Independence. Yet in designing that first flag, it harkened back to the colonists’ British roots. The Continental Congress put white stripes over the giant red square and still kept the British Union Jack. The stripes were the first insignia to tell the world the United States was now an independent authority.

3. George Washington was thought to have raised the Grand Union Flag a year later on New Year’s Day in 1776 on Prospect Hill, near Cambridge, Mass. In the letters to the Continental Congress, the Continental Navy Committee noted “the largest Ship will carry at her Mizen Peak a Jack with the Union flag, and striped red and white in the field.”

4. The Grand Union Flag was called other names: Continental Colors, the Congress Flag, the Cambridge Flag, and the First Navy Ensign

5. As the nation grew, so did the flag to 15 stars and a cumbersome 15 stripes. Congress then granted the Navy an additional honor in 1818: Design a flag that would grow in proportion but not be unwieldy. It is still the standard: 13 stripes that never change in number with a constellation of stars representing each state.

Naval Customs, Traditions, & Etiquette

http://www.public.navy.mil/usff/Pages/customs.aspx

Star-Spangled Manners

http://www.navy.mil/navydata/nav_legacy.asp?id=190

Naval Telecommunications Procedure

http://navybmr.com/study%20material/NTP_3.pdf

 
Jul 5

John Paul Jones’s 266th Birthday

Friday, July 5, 2013 3:27 PM
jones_por

John Paul Jones, Father of the U.S. Navy
Born 6 July 1747

As an officer of the Continental Navy of the American Revolution, John Paul Jones, born July 6, 1747, helped establish the traditions of courage and professionalism that today’s Sailors of the United States Navy proudly maintain. John Paul was born in a humble gardener’s cottage in Kirkbean, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland, went to sea as a youth, and was a merchant shipmaster by the age of 21. Having taken up residence in Virginia, he volunteered early in the War of Independence to serve in his adopted country’s young navy and raised with his own hands the Continental ensign on board the flagship of the Navy’s first fleet. He took the war to the enemy’s homeland with daring raids along the British coast and the famous victory of the Bonhomme Richard over HMS Serapis. After the Bonhomme Richard began taking on water and fires broke out on board, the British commander asked Jones if he had struck his flag. Jones replied, “I have not yet begun to fight!” In the end, it was the British commander who surrendered.

Jones is remembered for his indomitable will and his unwillingness to consider surrender when the slightest hope of victory still burned. Throughout his naval career, Jones promoted professional standards and training. Sailors of the United States Navy can do no better than to emulate the spirit behind John Paul Jones’s stirring declaration: “I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast for I intend to go in harm’s way.”

Although John Paul Jones is often credited with being the “father” of the U.S. Navy, there are many men who are responsible for the Navy’s establishment. Naval records show that the Continental Congress created the Navy in the resolution in Philadelphia on Oct. 13, 1775, a date now recognized as the Navy’s birthday, so members of Congress must collectively receive credit for the creation of the Continental Navy, the forerunner of the modern U.S. Navy.

The importance of the sea as a highway, a source of food, or a battlefield, if necessary, was well understood by the American colonists. When the American Revolution came, there were many who played prominent roles in the founding of the U.S. Navy, including George Washington, John Barry, John Paul Jones, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and many others.

Should John Paul Jones be considered the “Father” of the U.S. Navy? If not, who do you believe earns this title?

CAPTION: Battle between Bonhomme Richard and HMS Serapis. Painting by Thomas Mitchell

CAPTION: Battle between Bonhomme Richard and HMS Serapis. Painting by Thomas Mitchell

The next time you are in Annapolis, MD, stop by the US Naval Academy to view the corporal remains of John Paul Jones which were interred into the crypt beneath the Naval Academy Chapel in 1906 in a ceremony presided over by President Theodore Roosevelt. From the point of his death in 1792 until then, John Paul Jones’ remains had been in a grave in France, where he died.

 

 
Jul 18

John Paul Jones Remembered

Wednesday, July 18, 2012 8:15 AM

Portrait of John Paul Jones by Cecilia Beaux in the U. S. Naval Academy Museum

The United State’s first well-known naval fighter died 220 years ago, on July 18, 1792. Originally published in the July 1947 issue of Proceedings to mark the bicentennial of his birth, the following article outlines the life of John Paul Jones and his contributions to the Navy.

THE BICENTENNIAL OF JOHN PAUL JONES

By DR. LINCOLN LORENZ

VIEWED from the bicentennial of his birth, John Paul Jones has even greater eminence now as a leader of the American Navy at its beginning than he won at the time of his incomparable triumph in the battle of the Bonhomme Richard with the Serapis. The climax of his intrepid career on this occasion was in keeping with his life so that he remains today, even following the panorama of heroic exploits of two world wars, an indomitable warrior of unique personality. He became the first American naval officer to set a tradition of victory, to win respect for the flag by other nations, and to have the statesmanship to foresee and urge the paramount importance of the Navy in our future history. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 26

The Final Resting Place of John Paul Jones

Thursday, January 26, 2012 1:00 AM

January 26th, 1913

The body of John Paul Jones is interred at the U. S. Naval Academy.

 

Almost a full century ago, the body of John Paul Jones, recently discovered in a Parisian cemetery, reached its final resting place in an ornate crypt on the campus of the U. S. Naval Academy. Fifty years after the discovery of his remains, the July 1955 issue of Proceedings printed a an article about the search for and identification of Jones’ body, written by a freelance writer, Dorothy Tooker. In her article, Tooker told the story of restoring the American naval hero to his rightful tomb, from the challenges of finding his body in Paris, to the task of identifying his remains after they had been discovered in an unmarked coffin. For John Paul Jones, whose mystery endured almost 113 years after his death, this story of his return to the United States makes a fitting end.

The breeze blew cold through the tunnel, and the smell of damp from its earthen walls permeated the men’s nostrils. At the bend in the passageway the grave gentlemen in derby hats halted while workmen dragged an old leaden coffin into the passageway. It was outmoded, tapered at the foot with a widened, rounded projection at the head, and encrusted with dirt and mold from long burial. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 4

John Paul Jones Hoists First Stars and Stripes Flag 4 July 1777

Monday, July 4, 2011 12:01 AM

Standing at attention during the playing of The Star Spangled Banner, saluting the national ensign, and reciting the “Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag” are all acts performed occasionally by most Americans and regularly by the men and women who wear the uniforms of the armed services. These acts have meaning because of the flag’s symbolic significance. The stars and stripes represent the nation’s independence, the sacrifices that established and have maintained our freedom, and our national values embodied in the Declaration of Independence. This is why the displaying of a large stars and stripes flag on a building opposite the site of the Twin Towers had such a powerfully emotional impact on 11 September 2001.

From the very beginnings of the United States, the flag has played a role in the careers of all naval personnel. Perhaps in no Sailor’s story, however, has the country’s flag figured more prominently than in that of the Revolutionary War naval hero John Paul Jones. Jones is remembered for bringing America’s fight for liberty to the shores of the enemy—the Ranger’s capture of HMS Drake in the Irish Sea, the raid on Whitehaven, Scotland, and especially the Bonhomme Richard ’s capture of HMS Serapis in the Battle off Flamborough Head, within site of the English shore. As proud as he was of these accomplishments at the birth of the nation, John Paul Jones boasted as well of his association with the birth of the flag.

Even before the American colonies were independent or had adopted a national ensign to symbolize their rights as a free and equal people, John Paul Jones understood the power of a flag to embody the aspirations of a nation and to inspire loyalty. On 6 December 1775, as the Continental Navy ship Alfred’s newly commissioned first lieutenant, Jones hoisted the Grand Union flag of the thirteen united colonies. Recalling this event four years later, he wrote, “I hoisted with my own hands the flag of freedom the first time it was displayed on board the Alfred in the Delaware.”

On 4 July 1777, the first anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, Captain John Paul Jones hoisted the stars and stripes flag on board his own command, the Continental Navy ship Ranger, then in Boston Harbor fitting out for a cruise against the enemies of the Scottish born Jones’s adopted country. Just a few weeks earlier, on 14 June 1777, meeting in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, the Continental Congress decreed the design for the new nation’s national ensign. Congress resolved “that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.” Later that same day, Congress appointed Jones commander of the Ranger, the ship in which he would make the enemy taste the bitter draft of war in their home waters.

On 14 February 1778, seven months after first hoisting the stars and stripes aboard Ranger, Jones exchanged salutes with a French fleet’s flagship in Quiberon Bay, France. On 6 February the French king had secretly signed treaties of commerce and of alliance with the United States. The exchange of salutes in Quiberon Bay was the first official public act of recognition of the flag of the United States as an independent nation by another sovereign country.

On this Fourth of July, aware of the place of the flag in the career and in the heart of John Paul Jones, one of the founders of the Navy’s proud heritage, we might consider what the flag means to us.

 
Jan 26

John Paul Jones’ Crypt

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 12:01 AM

A most impressive site at the United States Naval Academy is the crypt holding the body of America’s great Revolutionary War naval hero John Paul Jones. Visited by thousands of people each year, it is an icon of both the Naval Academy and the United States Navy. How that crypt came to be is an interesting story.

Jones died alone and almost forgotten in Paris in 1792, where he was buried in an obscure cemetery that was later paved over. When in the early 1900’s President Theodore Roosevelt wanted to celebrate the emergence of the United States as a world-class naval power, he decided that the country should pay due honor to its first great naval hero.

The first step was to find the body. It took the American ambassador to France, Gen. Horace Porter, several months and much money to find Jones’ remains, which were finally located beneath a laundry on the outskirts of the city.

Once a careful comparison of the remarkably well-preserved corpse with a bust done of Jones by Jean-Antoine Houdon in 1780 confirmed that the body was that of Jones, Roosevelt decided to return it to the United States with appropriate pomp and to demonstrate that the U.S. was fast becoming the world’s premiere naval power, as Jones had once predicted it would. Four cruisers brought the body to American waters where they were joined by eleven of the Navy’s finest battleships. This combined force steamed into Chesapeake Bay, where the body was unloaded and sent to Annapolis. Commemorative exercises were held there on 24 April 1906, with speeches by numerous dignitaries, including Roosevelt.

Then the process stalled. Congress was slow to appropriate money for a permanent resting place so the body remained on trestles in Bancroft Hall for seven years and irreverent midshipman were soon singing a parody of the popular song “Everybody Works but Father”:

Everybody works but John Paul Jones!

He lies around all day,

Body pickled in alcohol

On a permanent jag, they say.

Middies stand around him

Doing honor to his bones;

Everybody works in “Crabtown”

But John Paul Jones!

Not until 26 January 1913 was Jones’ body moved into its permanent resting place, the marble sarcophagus designed by Sylvain Salières and modeled after the tomb of Napoleon in the Invalides. It took a long time, but everyone must agree, they got it right in the end.