Archive for the 'Aircraft' Category

Nov 14

Eugene B. Ely’s First Flight From a Ship: November 14, 1910

Sunday, November 14, 2010 12:01 AM


Short version of “Wings for the Navy” highlighting Ely’s First Flight on 11-14-1910.  

Nov 9

“I was coming head on at one of them” Lt. Comdr. William T. Amen

Tuesday, November 9, 2010 12:01 AM


During a fierce battle over North Korea Lt. Comdr. William T. Amen of VF-111 Sun Downers made the Navy’s first MiG kill, on 9 November 1950. Amen, the Sun Downer’s skipper, led a group of F9F-2B Panthers flying from Philippine Sea (CV 47) that covered a strike force of Corsairs and Skyraiders against the Sinuiju Bridge when at least five MiGs flying from the sanctity of Antung, Manchuria, attacked them. The Panther pilots lost no time as they aggressively streaked in to protect the bombers, and the battle swirled from just above ground level up to eighteen thousand feet. Turning… Read the rest of this entry »

Nov 4

1st Seaplane Launch From Submarine

Thursday, November 4, 2010 7:37 AM


Following WW1, the Navy began experimenting with the possibility of submarine observation and scouting aircraft; S-1 became the experimental platform for this project, late in 1923. She was altered by having a steel capsule mounted aft the conning tower; a cylindrical pod which could house a small collapsible seaplane, the Martin MS-1. After surfacing, this plane could be rolled out, quickly assembled, and launched by ballasting the sub until the deck was awash. The first successful attempt was made on November 5th 1923.

Oct 10

Commitment and Perseverance: Float plane pilots Ens. Harvey P. Jolly and Lt (jg) Robert L. Dana.

Sunday, October 10, 2010 12:01 AM


Of the many dangerous and unglamorous assignments during World War II, flying single-engine float planes as part of an aviation detachment in a cruiser was particularly grueling duty. Tasked with scouting, search & rescue and gunfire spotting missions, the hours were long – especially in an open cockpit – the task technically complicated and the mission critical. It was also extremely dangerous, as pilots and support crew struggled with salt corrosion, lack of spare parts, tricky water landings and high performance enemy fighters. The wartime exploits of two pilots of the float plane detachment in light cruiser Biloxi (CL 80)… Read the rest of this entry »

Oct 8

Trailer to “Wings for the Navy…the Birth of Naval Aviation”

Friday, October 8, 2010 12:27 PM


This is a trailer for the 25 minute video “Wings for the Navy …the Birth of Naval Aviation” which is being prepared for next year’s Centennial of Naval Aviation.

Oct 4

Navy-Marine Corps Photo Reconnaissance Over Cuba

Monday, October 4, 2010 10:51 AM


As Fidel Castro worked furiously to build an offensive missile capability in the Caribbean in the fall of 1962, the Navy/Marine Corps team utilized his folly as an opportunity to demonstrate its inherent synergy. Navy Light Photographic Squadron Sixty-Two (VFP-62), stationed at Cecil Field, Jacksonville, Florida, received the warning order in early October to have 8 camera-ready RF-8A Crusaders ready to launch from Naval Air Station (NAS) Key West on short notice. The mission was treacherously simple: confirm the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba. Shortly thereafter, the Second Marine Aircraft Wing (2d MAW) at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry… Read the rest of this entry »

Sep 30

Naval Aviation

Thursday, September 30, 2010 12:01 AM


This silent film, shot circa 1930, contains footage of aircraft squadrons from the first aircraft carriers of the United States Navy: USS Langley (CV-1), USS Lexington (CV-2), and USS Saratoga (CV-3).  

Sep 24

The Navy’s First Ace: Lieutenant Junior Grade David S. Ingalls

Friday, September 24, 2010 12:01 AM


While on a test flight in a British Sopwith Camel on 24 September 1918, Lieutenant Junior Grade David S. Ingalls sighted a German two-seat Rumpler over Nieuport, Belgium. In company with another Camel he aggressively dove in and scored his fifth aerial victory in six weeks to become the Navy’s first ace. Born to a life of privilege in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1899, Ingalls had matriculated at Yale University when WWI erupted. As a young man he enjoyed tinkering with aircraft, and enlisted as a machinist mate second class as a member of the First Yale Unit, a group of… Read the rest of this entry »

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