Archive for the 'Art' Category

Nov 8

Naval History and Heritage Logo Contest Winning Designs Named

Friday, November 8, 2013 10:44 AM

NHHC Logo Winner

From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication Outreach Division

The Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) announced the winners of its logo design contest, whose work will serve to inspire the new NHHC logo.

The winning design (pictured right) came from Nathan E. Quinn, a graphics specialist at the Defense Media Activity.

“The main point I was trying to convey with the design is that ‘our past guides our future.’ I have an image of the USS Constitution, which is a long-standing symbol of the Navy. It has persevered through many hardships but still stands today and I think that is a good analogy of the strength and determination of today’s Navy,” said Quinn. “I also added the wheel and compass rose as another way to portray that the past guides us. Overall, I feel that this was a good mixture of visuals and symbolism and I’m honored that they chose the design from so many other great designs.”

The NHHC director and judging panel also favored a series of designs (pictured below) submitted by Peter Thielen, Jr., which was awarded honorable mention. The new logo, which will be released at a later time, will be based on the winning design but will also incorporate elements of the honorable mention designs.

Supporting Logo
Supporting Logo

“I was really impressed and encouraged by the creativity and thought that went into the dozens of submissions we received,” said Capt. Henry Hendrix, NHHC’s director who made the final selections. “The sweeping breadth of both history and heritage can boggle the mind, but I believe the winning design and the honorable mention designs span that expanse in a simple but representative and recognizable graphic.”

Dozens of designs were submitted and can all be seen at http://www.navalhistory.org/2013/09/12/nhhc-logo-design-submissions-tell-us-your-choice. The winning design was #23, and the honorable mention designs were #27 and #28.

NHHC has a long history of preserving, analyzing, and disseminating the history and heritage of the U.S. Navy. The organization traces its roots back to 1800 when President John Adams instructed the first Secretary of the Navy, Benjamin Stoddert, to prepare a catalog of professional books for use in the Secretary’s office. Over the next two centuries, the Navy’s history was collected through various offices and departments. Finally, in the early 1970s, the organization, ultimately entitled the Naval History and Heritage Command, became a single entity responsible for all aspects of Navy historical preservation and dissemination.

For more news from Naval History and Heritage Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/navhist/.

 
Sep 12

NHHC Logo Design Submissions – Tell Us Your Choice

Thursday, September 12, 2013 9:27 AM

After three quick months of open and fierce competition to help inspire Naval History and Heritage Command’s next logo, we’ve compiled all 40 submissions. We have to say, there isn’t one that didn’t get us thinking – great work contestants!

Now it’s your turn: Tell us what you think! Do any of them have the stuff to knock off the reigning NHHC logo?

Click here to view the NHHC logo submissions:

Of course, we are assembling a panel here to examine all the submissions, but determining what defines U.S. Navy history and heritage is everyone’s job. We think highly of your opinions — so share ‘em with us and the group here. We’re eager to hear from you – and we’ll be sure to pass on any thoughts or suggestions you have to the panel members and the Director of NHHC.

We’d ask that in the commentary section below, you choose one favorite design — or designs — that you believe best represent Naval History and Heritage Command and how its work and services are relevant in today’s Navy. Please include your comments, thoughts, suggestions and perhaps areas for improvement on the design.

We’d be remiss if we didn’t mention how truly honored we at NHHC are by the depth and breadth of thoughtful work by the designers. The Logo Contest allowed us to see a wide range of talent, new interpretations on what our command represents, and a host of new branding opportunities to consider. We are deeply grateful to all of you who participated and to those who have viewed and supported this effort online.

OK – get crackin’ and tell us what you think!

Your vote may help us find a new look! Thanks.

Your vote may help us find a new look! Thanks.

 
Feb 29

SeaBees Name and Insignia Officially Authorized

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 9:32 AM

Establishment of Naval Construction Battalions

March 5, 1942

VADM Ben Moreell, CEC, USN circa 1945

December, 1941, with the expected U.S. involvement in the coming World War, Rear Admiral Ben Moreell, Chief of the Navy’s Bureau of Yards and Docks, recommended establishing Naval Construction Battalions. With the attack on Pearl Harbor, his recommendation was approved. March, 5th, 1942  the name SeaBees and the now iconic insignia were officially authorized.

 

“The SeaBees in World War II,” by Admiral Ben Moreell

It is no simple matter to relate the World War II exploits of the SeaBees. Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 5

NavyTV – Lights, Camera – ACTION

Thursday, May 5, 2011 6:44 PM

Now Hear This – the GI Film Festival is coming to the Navy Memorial next week!

The GI Film Festival, the nation’s first and only military film festival, is coming to the Navy Memorial May 9-15, 2011. We have a week full of celebrity red carpet events, dazzling parties and inspirational films by and about our servicemembers and veterans.

Watch a preview here on NAVY TV – there’s also a highlight film of the 2010 Festival.

Buy your tickets for the GI Film Festival here and enter code “MIL11″ for a discount. See you THERE!

 
Dec 7

Remember Dec. 7th!

Tuesday, December 7, 2010 12:40 PM

Remember Dec. 7th! Poster designed by Allen Saalburg, issued by the Office of War Information, Washington, D.C., in 1942, in remembrance of the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941.

 
Aug 24

Phase 1 of SCORPION Project Complete!

Tuesday, August 24, 2010 8:31 AM

SCORPION Project barge transported back down the Patuxent after the completion of the field work.

 On August 12, the NHHC Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB), and its partners MD SHA and MHT, successfully completed the first phase of their three-year archaeological investigation of the Patuxent shipwreck believed to be the War of 1812 U.S. block sloop SCORPION. Firstly, a big thank you to our on-site visitors who made the trip out to Upper Marlboro, MD. It was great to see you and we really appreciate your support! We were also glad to welcome members of the press on site to inform them about the SCORPION project, our partnerships and the NHHC and were pleased to see the story covered in the Washington Post, Baltimore Sun and The Capital (Annapolis)

Underwater archaeologists preparing to dive on the wreck.

 During the first part of the two-week project, UAB’s team of underwater archaeologists, in cooperation with MD SHA and MHT, measured the site and extent of the wreck beneath the sediment via a process called “hydroprobing.” Based on the data from the hydroprobe, the team was then able to determine which parts of the wreck most warranted investigation. Archaeologists then removed the overburden (overlying sediment) from specific parts of the wreck using dredge systems; the sediment pulled from the wreck was suctioned up the dredge onto the barges where it was screened by capable staff. Some artifacts were also recovered and brought back to the UAB Conservation and Archaeology Lab for stabilization, treatment and documentation.

Again, the UA team is very grateful to MD SHA and MHT as well as URS and SUPSALV. With their help and cooperation, significant progress was made during Phase 1 and we look forward to working with them again on the next phase of the SCORPION project in summer 2011. We’re always glad to talk about the SCORPION project and answer any questions, so feel free to stop by our offices or send us an email (NHHCUnderwaterArchaeology@navy.mil) and stay tuned for more posts!

 
Aug 4

U.S. Coast Guard Art Program

Wednesday, August 4, 2010 2:20 PM

Air Station Savannah by Ken Smith

The Coast Guard Art Program has a corps of volunteer, professional artists who donate their talents to help tell the Coast Guard’s story. 

The artists capture the daily missions the 41,500 men and women of the Coast Guard perform including homeland security, search and rescue, marine environmental protection, drug interdiction, military readiness, and natural resource management. 

The collection also recounts the Coast Guard’s history from the early beginnings of our great nation into World War II, through the perils of Vietnam, Desert Storm, and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Today, the collection contains some 1,850 works and is displayed prominently in other majopr government locations such as the Department of Defense and congressional offices.

The Coast Guard is honored to have original artwork available for temporary loan, free of charge for public display at patriotic events, museums, libraries, and many other venues.

For information on the Coast Guard Art Program, please contact Mary Ann Bader by phone at 202-372-4643 or email. Mary.A. Bader[@]uscg.mil

 
May 5

This is Ann

Wednesday, May 5, 2010 1:00 PM

There is no doubt that we have some very unusual and unique items in our 150,000 item collection. Some are on display in our Rare Book Room, but others like this little book are tucked away safely on shelves waiting to be found. This particular item was found on a completely unrelated search last week. 

We had a question regarding whether or not a particular anchor could have come from a “Mosquito Boat” from the World War II era. After exhausting our anchor resources, including line drawings of anchors we decided to try searching for mosquito boats in our catalog. The record for this particular book showed up, and we were intrigued by the fact that the author was listed as Dr. Suess. Curious as to why we had a book by Dr. Suess in our collection we went up to Special Collections to find the undersized book. Sure enough here was a small book obviously illustrated by Dr. Suess and published by the Government Printing Office in 1944. 

This diminutive book chronicles the life and times of Ann, the Anopheles Mosquito and warns against the spread of Malaria. We’ve had the book digitized and it will join our collection in the Online Reading Room in the next couple of weeks. For now here is a preview of a few of the illustrations.

 
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