Archive for the 'Civil War' Category

Mar 25

The Conservation of Enfield Rifle Barrels from USS Tulip

Monday, March 25, 2013 9:32 AM


The Naval History and Heritage Command’s (NHHC) Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) manages the Archaeology & Conservation Laboratory which is primarily tasked with the documentation, treatment, preservation, and curation of artifacts from US Navy sunken military craft. Artifact conservation is an integral part of any archaeological investigation and allows for the long-term study, interpretation, and preservation of irreplaceable submerged cultural resources. Recently, the Archaeology & Conservation Lab has been treating a group of Enfield rifle barrels from the wreck site of USS Tulip. Purchased by the Union Navy during the Civil War, Tulip, a steam-screw gunboat, joined the Potomac River Flotilla… Read the rest of this entry »

Jan 11

H.L. Hunley Fully Visible for the First Time

Wednesday, January 11, 2012 11:06 AM


On February 17, 1864, Confederate-built H.L. Hunley became the world’s first successful combat submarine when it attacked and sank the 1240-short ton screw sloop USS Housatonic at the entrance to the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. H.L. Hunley surfaced briefly to signal a successful mission to comrades on shore with a blue magnesium light, after which it was never seen again. All eight of its crewmen were presumed lost and despite multiple search efforts, the submarine could not be relocated.  Over 136 years later, on 8 August, 2000, H.L. Hunley was raised from the sea floor using a specially-designed support frame, or truss. A multi-disciplinary team,… Read the rest of this entry »

Dec 26

Comission of U. S. Navy’s First Hospital Ship

Monday, December 26, 2011 1:00 AM


December 26th, 1862 USS Red Rover is commissioned The USS Red Rover, the first hospital ship of the U. S. Navy, was commissioned on December 26th, 1862, after a year of service in the Army during the Civil War. An article in the November 1968 issue of Proceedings, written by W. T. Adams, commemorates the Red Rover’s brief but successful career, which ended in 1865. Not only was the Red Rover the first ship of her kind, but she also served a variety of capacities for the Union forces during the War, far beyond the demands of an ordinary hospital… Read the rest of this entry »

Nov 3

Port Royal Week on the CWN 150 Blog

Thursday, November 3, 2011 3:11 PM


This week, the Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial is celebration the commemoration of the Port Royal Expedition. The expedition, which entered the sound on 3 November 1861, was the largest assemblage of ships (77) by the U.S. Navy at that point. The battle was an overwhelming victory for the Union, as well as a testament to combined Army/Navy operations that would subsist for the remainder of the war.  CWN 150 bloggers are focusing their attention on the battle this week HERE. The blog will show the most up to date information. There are now several posts about the history of the… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 1

Civil War at Sea – Navy TV

Friday, July 1, 2011 5:48 AM


Home > Navy Memorial > Civil War at Sea Civil War at Sea The Navy Memorial hosted an all-day symposium on April 23, 2011 called the “Civil War at Sea.” Historians, curators, Civil War reenactors, archaeologists and authors convened to discuss the Confederate and Union navies’ contributions to the War. Fascinating presentations! If you missed them, watch them here on NavyTV

May 26

Navy TV – Civil War at Sea

Thursday, May 26, 2011 2:34 PM


The Navy Memorial hosted an all-day symposium on April 23: the “Civil War at Sea.” Historians, curators, Civil War reenactors, archaeologists and authors convened to discuss the Confederate and Union navies’ contributions to the War. Watch the keynote address by Craig Symonds, renowned Civil War navies’ historian and author here on NavyTV.

Apr 13

Beginning of Civil War

Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:20 AM


April, 12th 1861 Civil War begins when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter, Charleston South Carolina

Mar 9

First Clash of the Ironclads, 9 March 1862

Wednesday, March 9, 2011 12:01 AM


At dawn on 9 March 1862, the Confederate ironclad CSS Virginia prepared for renewed combat in Hampton Roads, Virginia. The previous day the ship had seen her first combat action, utterly defeating two large Federal sailing frigates and demonstrating the superiority of armored steam-powered warships over their wooden sailing counterparts. Today, she expected to inflict a similar fate on the grounded steam frigate Minnesota and other enemy ships, probably freeing the lower Chesapeake Bay region of Union seapower and the land forces it supported. However, as they surveyed the opposite side of Hampton Roads, where Minnesota and other potential victims… Read the rest of this entry »

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