Archive for the 'Revenue Cutter Service' Category

Aug 1

Hamilton’s Revenue Fleet

Thursday, August 1, 2013 2:00 AM

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Illustration of USRC Massachusetts

The following article, Hamilton’s Revenue Fleet by Hyman R. Kaplan was first published in Naval Institute Proceedings in October, 1962. After nearly 172 years of obscurity, a hitherto neglected exchange of correspondence between Alexander Hamilton, first Secretary of the Treasury, and Sharp Delany, first Federal Collector of Customs at Philadelphia, has been uncovered in the voluminous files of the Philadelphia Customs House. Fragile and yellowed with age, the letters shed new light on early American history as well as on the origins of the U . S. Coast Guard, initially sponsored by Hamilton in 1790. The story begins on 7… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 4

Establishment of U. S. Coast Guard

Thursday, August 4, 2011 2:00 AM

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August 4, 1790  Congress establishes the U. S. Coast Guard as part of a new revenue law. In March 1976, Proceedings published a special issue about the U.S. Coast Guard, which included an article by Commander Roger P. Vance, U. S. Coast Guard Reserve, about the origin of the Coast Guard. Vance’s article describes how, under the newly-formed Constitution, the need for a revenue system that would discourage smuggling resulted in the creation of a small fleet of cutters responsible for enforcing the revenue laws of the new American government: We now know our Constitution to be sound and durable. But in early… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 4

Founders of the U. S. Coast Guard

Thursday, August 4, 2011 1:00 AM

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August 4, 1790 Creation of U. S. Revenue Marine   In March 1976, Proceedings published a brief article by Truman R. Strobridge and Bernard C. Nalty about the discovery of correspondence between Alexander Hamilton, credited with the creation of the Revenue Marine, and Colonel Sharp Delaney, a Customs collector at the time. This correspondence, regarding the use of ships to enforce the new Customs laws of the Constitution, suggests that Hamilton may not have been solely responsible for the conception of the service that is today known as the U. S. Coast Guard. As Strobridge and Nalty write: No one denies that… Read the rest of this entry »