Archive for the 'Events' Category

Dec 11

Operation Inland Seas

Saturday, December 11, 2010 12:01 AM


 The St. Lawrence Seaway opened in 1959, allowing large ships to transit from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean. That summer, the U.S. Navy launched Operation Inland Seas, a massive public relations tour of the lakes by ships from the Atlantic Fleet. This 1960 documentary, narrated by Glenn Ford, tells the story.   Source: Naval History and Heritage Command, Photographic Section, UM-23.

Dec 7

Pearl Harbor through the eyes of Tai Sing Loo

Tuesday, December 7, 2010 1:00 AM


Tai Sing Loo was the official Navy photographer of Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. In this excerpt from Air Raid: Pearl Harbor edited by Paul Stillwell, Mr. Loo provided a unique account of his experiences that day. How I Were at Pearl Harbor By Tai Sing Loo On the 6th of December, Saturday afternoon, I had made arrangement with [Platoon] Sergeant [Charles R.] Christenot to have all his Guard be at the Main Gate between 8:30 to 9:30 o’clock Sunday morning to have a group of picture taken in front of the new concrete entrance… Read the rest of this entry »

Nov 29

Army vs Navy Football.

Monday, November 29, 2010 1:00 AM


The Army/Navy rivalry existed well before the first football game took place. Both schools would routinely challenge the other, but not being able to decide on which sport to compete in, the two schools didn’t meet until November 29th 1890. This first game took place in Westpoint with Navy taking home the win 24-0. Bottom: Pearson, ’93; Laws, ’91; Althouse, ’91; Beuret, ’92. Middle: Syminton, ’92; Emrich, ’91 (Team Captain); Johnson, ’93; Hartung, ’91. Top: Macklin, ’92; Trench, ’93; Irwin, ’91; Lane, ’91; Ward, ’93; Smith, ’91

Nov 20

World Record Flight

Saturday, November 20, 2010 1:01 AM


On November 20th 1933, LCDR Thomas G.W. Settle, USN and MAJ Chester I. Fordney, USMC set a world record balloon flight into the stratosphere at 62,237 ft. The Soviet Union had captured the imagination of the world by sending men higher than anyone had ever gone before. America’s response was made shortly afterward by a naval officer and a Marine officer. Their names were not Shepard and Glenn, and the time was not the Sixties, but the Thirties. In an all-but-forgotten flight, two American military men carried their country’s colors to a world altitude record and began the race for… Read the rest of this entry »

Nov 16

OpSail 2012

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 10:09 AM


This 2012, Operation Sail and the US. Navy will once again bring the glory of tall ships to the American seaboard to celebrate the bicentennial of our national anthem, The Star-Spangled Banner. A parade of magnificent tall ships and warships, from over 25 nations, will sail to five historic ports: New Orleans, Norfolk, Boston, Baltimore, and New York City and join America in commemoration of this national milestone. Operation Sail, (OpSail), a national non-profit organization dedicated to promoting goodwill among nations, and the development of youth through sail training, was conceived in 1961 by Frank Braynard and Nils Hansell. Following… Read the rest of this entry »

Oct 5

David Takes On Goliath: 5 October 1863

Tuesday, October 5, 2010 1:30 AM


On the night of 5 October 1863, David faced Goliath. It would not be the epic showdown of biblical times during the American Civil War, but one of explosions, iron, and rushing water under the moonlight of Charleston. USS New Ironsides, a casemate ironclad steamer boasting fourteen eleven-inch smoothbores, was at the time considered the most formidable warship in the world. It proved to be nearly impenetrable to the Charleston harbor defenses. The Union “Goliath” and its Captain, S.C. Rowan, waited for any answer the Confederates had to test the mighty ship. Little did they know its “Davidian” foe would… Read the rest of this entry »

Sep 8

Honda Point Wreck: 8 September 1923

Wednesday, September 8, 2010 12:01 AM


Today is the 87th anniversary of the 1923 grounding of seven destroyers at Point Perdanales, California, also called Honda Point. Following a day of maneuvers and a high-speed run south from San Francisco Bay, the fourteen destroyers of Destroyer Squadron 11 turned east toward the Santa Barbara Channel, soon entering dense fog. However, the force was north of where they thought they were, and a few minutes after the turn the flagship USS Delphy (DD 261) ran aground at 20 knots, quickly followed by six other ships. Twenty-three sailors died, and the seven ships were left in place to be… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 30

Decatur & Gunboat Diplomacy in Tunis, 30 July 1815

Friday, July 30, 2010 6:00 AM


Historians depict the War of 1812 as a forgotten conflict because the Treaty of Ghent affirmed the status quo for the two combatants,. American naval victories during that war, however, had greatly improved the U.S. Navy’s stature. On 23 February 1815, only six days after that war had ended, President James Madison confidently proposed a declaration of war against Algiers for its depredations against American merchant commerce in the Mediterranean perpetrated during the late war with England. Eleven years after his daring 1804 raid to destroy the captured frigate USS Philadelphia held by Tripoli during the first Barbary War, Stephen… Read the rest of this entry »

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