Archive for the 'News' Category

Apr 14

USS Chester Escorts Survivors of Titanic Disaster

Thursday, April 14, 2011 1:29 AM


April, 14th 1912 RMS Titanic struck an iceberg and sank at 2:20 in the morning, resulting in the deaths of 1,517 people.

Oct 12

Ten Years Later: Remembering USS Cole

Tuesday, October 12, 2010 8:55 AM


Ten years ago, Secretary of the Navy Richard Danzig reflected on the terrorist attack on the USS Cole. Today we remember and honor the crew with his words, written in his Proceedings magazine article, “America Loves Its Citizens”: “Mr. Secretary, we will save this ship. We will repair this ship. We will take this ship home, and we will sail this ship again to sea.” One of the reasons that I love America is because it loves its citizens. In other times, and on this very day in other places, people are regarded as means and not ends, as fodder,… Read the rest of this entry »

Aug 24

Phase 1 of SCORPION Project Complete!

Tuesday, August 24, 2010 8:31 AM


 On August 12, the NHHC Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB), and its partners MD SHA and MHT, successfully completed the first phase of their three-year archaeological investigation of the Patuxent shipwreck believed to be the War of 1812 U.S. block sloop SCORPION. Firstly, a big thank you to our on-site visitors who made the trip out to Upper Marlboro, MD. It was great to see you and we really appreciate your support! We were also glad to welcome members of the press on site to inform them about the SCORPION project, our partnerships and the NHHC and were pleased to see the story covered in the Washington Post, Baltimore… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 31

What’s in a Name: The Missouri Lineage

Saturday, July 31, 2010 12:01 AM


The first Missouri, a wooden-hulled sidewheel steam-frigate, was commissioned in early 1842. In the summer of 1843 she departed the United States, under the command of Captain John Taylor Newton, to convey a diplomat to Alexandria, Egypt. On the evening of 26 August, as Missouri lay in the harbor of Gibraltar, the accidental breakage of a demijohn of turpentine started a fire when the liquid fell upon a lighted lamp. Capt. Newton, paying the customary call on the governor of the crown colony, returned to Missouri when he learned of the fire. Some of Missouri’s crew had rigged the pumps… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 30

After 65 years, Shipyard Worker Reunites with USS Orleck (DD-886)

Friday, July 30, 2010 12:01 AM


Brandon Richards of KPLC 7 in Lake Charles, Louisiana reports: It’s been sixty-five years since J.T. Platt last boarded the USS Orleck. “I was one of the grunts. I did what I was told,” said Platt, who worked at Consolidated Steel Corporation, the group that built the Orleck starting in 1944. Platt worked at the company in Orange, Texas from 1944 to 1945. He left Consolidated Steel two months after the Orleck was commissioned. Platt was part of the original group from Consolidated Steel, responsible for making sure all of the equipment on board the Orleck was in working order…. Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 28

USS Gravely DDG-107 Update

Wednesday, July 28, 2010 12:01 AM


According to Navy News Service, “The Navy officially accepted delivery of the future USS Gravely from Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding during a ceremony July 26 in Pascagoula, Miss. Designated DDG 107, Gravely is the 57th ship of the Arleigh Burke class.”  Moreover, according to Navy News Service, “The new destroyer honors the late Vice Adm. Samuel L. Gravely Jr., the first African American commissioned as an officer from the Navy Reserve Officer Training Course. He was the first African American to command a warship (USS Theodore E. Chandler); to command a major warship (USS Jouett); to achieve flag rank and eventually… Read the rest of this entry »

Jul 27

Operation Crossroads: Able and Baker Day Tests

Tuesday, July 27, 2010 12:01 AM


Atomic bomb testing at Bikini Atoll is the subject of this 1946 Navy documentary.

Jul 17

Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Memorial to Become Newest National Monument Today

Saturday, July 17, 2010 12:05 AM


Sam Richards of the Contra Costa Times writes, “The National Park Service, in partnership with the U.S. Army and Friends of Port Chicago, will dedicate the newest national monument — by definition a national park “unit” — and honor all who served at Port Chicago Naval Base when two munitions ships and several boxcars exploded on July 17, 1944, north of Concord. Saturday is the 66th anniversary of the explosion that killed 320 men and injured nearly 400 others — the worst home front disaster of World War II.” For more information and photos about the July 17, 1944 explosion… Read the rest of this entry »

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