Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Aug 22

War of 1812 Exhibit ‘Defeat to Victory’ Opens for Family Day at Washington Navy Yard

Friday, August 22, 2014 8:00 AM
WASHINGTON (Aug. 19, 2014) – A map of showing the battles during 1814, a depiction of the burning of Washington D.C. and the Flag of the United States in 1814 greet visitors to the National Museum of the United States Navy as the museum's new War of 1812 exhibit, "1814: From Defeat to Victory," prepares to open at the NMUSN on the Washington Navy Yard. The exhibit's grand opening is set for Aug. 24, the anniversary of the burning of Washington D.C. and the Washington Navy Yard, and showcases battles and armaments of the U.S. and British Army and Navy during the victories and defeats of 1814. (U.S. Navy Photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford / Released)

WASHINGTON (Aug. 19, 2014) – A map of showing the battles during 1814, a depiction of the burning of Washington D.C. and the Flag of the United States in 1814 greet visitors to the National Museum of the United States Navy as the museum’s new War of 1812 exhibit, “1814: From Defeat to Victory,” prepares to open at the NMUSN on the Washington Navy Yard. The exhibit’s grand opening is set for Aug. 24, the anniversary of the burning of Washington D.C. and the Washington Navy Yard, and showcases battles and armaments of the U.S. and British Army and Navy during the victories and defeats of 1814. (U.S. Navy Photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford / Released)

By the National Museum of the United States Navy, Naval History and Heritage Command

Please join us at the Washington Navy Yard from noon until 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 24 for a Family Day when we commemorate two of the most important events of the War of 1812: the Battle of Bladensburg and the burning of the Washington Navy Yard.

To commemorate these events, the National Museum of the United States Navy will open the new exhibit “Defeat to Victory: 1814-1815” and holding a number of events. From noon to 4 p.m., families can enjoy craft activities including making model ships, pin wheels, and flags. There will also be a chance to get immersed in what the War of the 1812 would really have been like, with an opportunity to look through a sailor’s sea chest and surgeon’s kit, hear music in two special 1812 themed concerts by living history musicians The Chanteyman, and even see an authentic artillery drill!

Pride of Baltimore II will be docked alongside display ship Barry at the Washington Navy Yard until Aug. 25. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford

Pride of Baltimore II will be docked alongside display ship Barry at the Washington Navy Yard until Aug. 25. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford

Joining our celebrations is a visit from Pride of Baltimore II through Aug. 25 with public visitation from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. each day. This ship is a reproduction of an 1812-era topsail schooner privateer and her visit will give you a feel of how the Washington Navy Yard looked in August of 1814 when the Yard was bustling with the building, repairing and supplying of ships for the Navy. Visitors can tour the ship from the Riverwalk throughout her visit and on the 24th witness a gun demonstration at 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m.

A historical hour-long walking tour on the “Burning of the Washington Navy Yard” will happen twice, 7 p.m. on the 22nd and 4 p.m. on the 24th. Learn about this important event with members of the National Museum of the United States Navy, treading where men like Commodore Joshua Barney once walked. Attendees should meet at Building 76 of the National Museum of the United States Navy five minutes before the tour starts. Reservations for the tour can be made by calling 202-433-6897. Guests without U.S .military, U.S. Civil Service or law enforcement identification will need to register. We will need the names of all the adults, 18 years of age and older, as well as their driver’s license number and from which state it is issued. Last minute add-ons can be accommodated as long as they have a military ID/CAC.

WASHINGTON (Aug. 19, 2014) – The swords of U.S. Navy Commodore, Joshua Barney, and British General, Robert Ross are exhibited as part of the National Museum of the United States Navy's (NMUSN) new War of 1812 exhibit, "1814: From Defeat to Victory," on the Washington Navy Yard. Barney and 500 Sailors and Marines faced down more than 4,000 british troops led by Ross at the Battle of Bladensburg. Though ultimately the U.S. was defeated at Bladensburg and an injured Barney was forced to surrender his sword to the British General, he was taken prisoner instead of being killed because of the heroism of his men and himself in the face of battle. The exhibit's grand opening is set for Aug. 24, the anniversary of the burning of Washington D.C. and the Washington Navy Yard, and showcases battles and armaments of the U.S. and British Army and Navy during the victories and defeats of 1814. (U.S. Navy Photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford / Released)

WASHINGTON (Aug. 19, 2014) – The swords of U.S. Navy Commodore, Joshua Barney, and British General, Robert Ross are exhibited as part of the National Museum of the United States Navy’s (NMUSN) new War of 1812 exhibit, “1814: From Defeat to Victory,” on the Washington Navy Yard. (U.S. Navy Photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford / Released)

The Family Day on Aug. 24 promises to be an exciting reason to visit the National Museum of the United States Navy. The museum is free, opening Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on weekends and Federal Holidays between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Guests without U.S. military, U.S .Civil Service or law enforcement identification must be escorted by a member of their party with accepted ID, escorted by museum staff, or call five working days in advance for a reservation.

On weekdays, all visitors who require escort must enter the 11th and O Street SE gate to obtain a visitor pass and escort. On weekends, all visitors will enter the 6th and M Street SE gate. Those who require an escort will obtain one at the 6th and M Street gate. All adults 18 years of age and older must have current government photo ID, such as a driver’s license or passport. For questions about access or to make a reservation to visit the Washington Navy Yard, please call (202) 433-6897 or (202) 433-6826. For the most current information on hours, visitation procedures, and more information about the National Museum of the United States Navy, visit our website at www.history.navy.mil/NMUSN, and follow us on Facebook (National Museum of the United States Navy) and Twitter @NtlMuseumUSNavy.

The Washington Navy Yard and the U.S. Navy Museum is accessible by both the Navy Yard (green), Eastern Market (blue and orange) metro line stations and several Metro Bus routes including the D.C. Circulator. Please visit Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority Metro’s website for more details and service status.

  • Eastern Market Metro Station (Orange/Blue Line)
    Exit the metro station and walk south on 8th St SE for 0.5 miles.
    Weekdays: Turn left onto M St SE for 1 block and turn right onto 11th St. The O St gate is the last gate before the water.
    Weekends: Turn right onto M St SE and continue for two more blocks and enter the 6th and M St SE gate.
  • Navy Yard Metro Station (Green Line)
    Exit the metro station via New Jersey Ave.
    Weekdays: Walk east on M St until you come to 11th St and turn right. The O St gate is the last gate before the water.
    Weekends: Walk east on M St until you arrive at the 6th St gate.

Be advised that Metro’s weekend service adjustments August 22-24 beginning at 10 p.m. Friday night and continuing through system closing on Sunday. 

 
Aug 21

#PeopleMatter: Naval Aviator Earns First #MOH for Rescue of Downed Pilot

Thursday, August 21, 2014 8:00 AM
Hammann and Ludlow

Lt. George H. Ludlow in his seaplane, who was rescued after his plane was disabled by enemy fire on Aug. 21, 1918, by Ensign Charles H. Hammann, inset. NH Photo #49249

By Naval History and Heritage Command, Communications and Outreach Division

 A mission of dropping propaganda pamphlets might sound pretty tame these days. But in 1918, just months after the U.S. joined most of Europe in fighting the Germans, Austria-Hungarians, Ottoman Empire and Bavaria, it was a vital and often dangerous effort to turn the citizens against their oppressors. And in Austria, those caught dropping such leaflets were executed.

And so it was, 96 years ago today, a leaflet-dropping mission began with five fighters and two bombers – all Americans pilots – flying Italian planes from Porto Corsini, Italy to Pola, Austria. Porto Corsini is located just 65 miles from Austria’s largest naval port, where the occupying Germans and Austro-Hungarians were launching submarines and battleships into the Mediterranean campaign from the heavily defended port with 18 forts and 114 anti-aircraft guns.

That Americans were part of this mission was a remarkable partnership between Italy and the United States. Italian instructors trained American pilots how to fly their Macchi flying boat planes: the M.8 2-seater equipped with a machine gun and capable of carrying four 24-pound bombs and the single seat M.5 fighters with two machine guns and the ability to carry a couple of light bombs. Although using Italian planes with Italian mechanics, the base would be operated by the United States, and so it was July 24, 1918, when the American flag was first raised over U.S. Naval Air Station Porto Corsini, Italy.

The Austrians welcomed the American pilots the next day by bombing the new naval air station.

Back to Aug. 21, 1918, and the seven-plane leaflet flight on its first bombing mission. Within 15 minutes of take-off, a fighter and a bomber turned back due to motor problems, leaving four fighters flown by Ensigns George Ludlow, E. H. Parker, Dudley Vorhees and Baltimore-born Charles Halverstine Hammann. They were flying at 12,000 feet as they approached Pola, but the bomber couldn’t get higher than 8,000 feet. As the leaflets were dropped, Austrians responded with anti-aircraft fire. Five Albatross fighters took flight and within five minutes, the dogfight was on at 8,000 feet.

Ludlow attacked the lead plane, forcing him into a dive. But Parker and Vorhees struggled with machine guns that jammed, eventually forcing them to leave the fight along with the bomber. That left Ludlow up against three planes and Hammann facing two. Ludlow fired on one fighter until it was smoking, taking hits in his plane’s propeller and engine. With oil streaming behind, the plane burst into flames. Ludlow put his crippled fighter into a spin, knocking out the fire, and then pulled it up to make a water landing five miles off the harbor entrance of Pola.

Ensign Charles H. Hammann

Ensign Charles H. Hammann

Hammann saw Ludlow’s plane go down and once he realized the pilot was not injured, he pulled out of his fight to rescue his fellow aviator. If captured, he faced execution as a spy. Despite damage to his own fighter, Hammann landed on choppy water in 20 mile-per-hour wind. Ludlow wasted no time scrambling over to Hammann’s single-seat plane, perched behind the pilot’s seat and under the motor, hanging onto the struts to keep from being pulled into the propeller or swept to sea. Ludlow had already punched holes in the wings to help the plane sink, so once Hammann’s Macchi was airborne, he fired the rest of his ammunition into the crippled craft. As it slipped under the waves, Hammann headed back for the 60-mile trip to base. The Austrians, perhaps admiring Hammann’s daring rescue, made no effort to pursue what would have been an easy target.

But the danger to Hammann and Ludlow was far from over. Hammann still needed to land the plane in the always tricky 100-foot wide canal often hit with crosswinds. While the landing was good, water pouring through the bow caused the plane to flip, destroying it. The pilots suffered bumps and bruises, but both were back on duty a few days later.

For his effort, Hammann would receive the Medal of Honor, the first aviator to earn the honor. “Although his machine was not designed for the double load to which it was subjected, and although there was danger of attack by Austrian planes, he made his way to Porto Corsini,” the citation stated.

Ludlow earned the Navy Cross and the Italians honored Hammann and Ludlow with its Silver and Bronze Medals of Valor, respectively.

The Air Station itself was recognized as having “the distinction of being the most heavily engaged unit of the 78 U.S. Naval Forces in Europe,” as stated by Adm. Henry Thomas Mayo, Commander in Chief of the Atlantic Fleet, during a Nov. 10, 1918 inspection of the base.

Less than a year later, on June 14, 1919, Ensign Hammann was killed in an air accident while piloting a Macchi flying boat at the fledging Langley Field in Hampton, Va. He was but 27.

The Navy has named two ships after Hammann: USS Hammann (DD 412), which was sunk during the Battle of Midway in June 1942, and a destroyer-escort, USS Hammann (DE 131) that was commissioned in 1943 and decommissioned in 1974.

As for the rescued Ludlow, he would survive World War I, being discharged at age 29 as a lieutenant junior grade in 1926. But after the United States entered World War II, the 45-year-old Ludlow returned to his Navy in 1942 and served until retiring as a commander in 1953.

 

 
Aug 20

#PeopleMatter: Naval Observatory Residence Honors Fleet Admiral Leahy

Wednesday, August 20, 2014 12:36 PM
WASHINGTON (Jul. 17, 2014) — The Leahy House in Washington, D.C. During World War 2, Fleet Adm. William Leahy was the Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Army and Navy, the President of the United States. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. David Zlotin)

WASHINGTON (Jul. 17, 2014) — The Leahy House in Washington, D.C. During World War 2, Fleet Adm. William Leahy was the Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Army and Navy, the President of the United States. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. David Zlotin)

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric Lockwood

What used to be known as “Quarters BB” at the Old Naval Observatory was recently renamed “Leahy House” in honor of Fleet Adm. William D. Leahy, who served during the Spanish-American War through to the Cold War.

But why Leahy?

Fleet Adm. William D. Leahy, circa 1945

Fleet Adm. William D. Leahy, circa 1945

The home’s current resident, Vice Adm. Kurt W. Tidd, Assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, believes Leahy does not share as prominent a place in history’s spotlight as some of his contemporaries.

“When you ask people to name all the five-star naval officers, they get [Chester] Nimitz, they get [Ernest] King, they get Bull Halsey,” said Tidd. “Almost nobody thinks about Fleet Adm. Leahy.”

Leahy started his long career as a Midshipman at the Naval Academy in 1897. He originally wanted to follow his father’s path as an Army officer, but West Point wasn’t offering any appointments, so he chose the Navy instead.

At that time in the Navy, by law, candidates for commission had to serve two years at sea before becoming officers. Leahy’s first two years were spent on the battleship Oregon, getting his first experience in conflict as the ship participated in the Battle of Santiago during the Spanish American War on July 3, 1898. Leahy donned his well-deserved ensign rank almost a year later on July 1, 1899.

During the Philippine Insurrection and the Boxer Rebellion in China, Leahy was there, serving on gunboat Castine, stores ship Glacier, and Mariveles, a gunship he commanded, between his commissioning date of Jul. 1, 1899 and 1902. During the American occupation of Nicaragua in 1912 he served as Chief of Staff to the Commander, Naval Forces in the country.

When Leahy took command of the dispatch gunboat Dolphin in 1915, he developed a close friendship with then-Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR). It was a friendship that would influence his career profoundly later in life.

Leahy saw a lot of action on-ship and off during his career before WWII. He was a part of transporting troops to France in 1918 during WWI and sailing Turkish waters during the Greco-Turkish war in 1921. This was followed by auspicious assignments as Director of Officer Personnel in the Bureau of Navigation and eventually becoming the Chief of Naval Operations in 1936.

WASHIGNTON (Jul. 17, 2014) — A model of the guided missile destroyer USS Leahy (DLG 16) sits in a glass case at the Leahy House. During World War 2, Fleet Adm. William Leahy was the Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Army and Navy, the President of the United States. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. David Zlotin)

WASHINGTON (Jul. 17, 2014) — A model of the guided missile destroyer USS Leahy (DLG 16) sits in a glass case at the Leahy House. During World War 2, Fleet Adm. William Leahy was the Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Army and Navy, the President of the United States. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. David Zlotin)

As war clouds were forming over Europe, one month shy of the invasion of Poland, Leahy retired. If that was the end of his story, he would have been able to tell the story of a long and honorable career. But almost as premonition, an old sailing buddy of his that had become the President of the United States, FDR told him on the occasion of his retirement, “Bill, if we have a war, you’re going to be right back here, helping me run it.”

War there was. Germany invaded Poland in September 1939 and Europe started towards another “Great War,” WWII. Before U.S Involvement, Leahy acted as Governor of Puerto Rico, and as the U.S. Ambassador to Vichy France until recalled in May 1942.

Franklin fulfilled his latent promise two months later, recalling Leahy to active duty as the Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Army and Navy, the President of the United States. In this position, he presided over the Joint Chiefs, and also the combined Chiefs when the U.S. was host. His duties were extraordinarily diverse, and it is to his credit and an attestation of his work ethic that his job is now separated into three different government positions: the chief of staff of the White House, the National Security Advisor and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Leahy was the first promoted to the highest rank achievable, Fleet Admiral in 1944, and it was at this rank that he retired permanently in 1949.

Leahy continued to serve the Navy even after retiring a second time, in the office of the Secretary of the Navy and as the president of the Naval Historical Foundation. He died July 20, 1959.

So why Leahy? The reasons are numerous, including being the first five-star admiral of World War II, a diplomat and confidante of presidents, a strategist, a veteran of three wars and living nearly his whole life in service to his Navy and his country. His remarkable career can serve as both an icon and a lesson for its steadiness of the Sailor’s spirit through the gamut of adversity — during times of prosperity, depression, war and peace. One thing is for certain, as Tidd intended it, when we see the house named for Leahy, we’ll remember and appreciate the man who gave so much in service to the nation that repeatedly called on him during her darkest hours.

WASHINGTON (Jul. 17, 2014) — Members of the Leahy family pose for a photo beside a painting of Fleet Adm. William Leahy, Jul. 17. During World War 2, Fleet Adm. William Leahy was the Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Army and Navy, the President of the United States. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. David Zlotin)

WASHINGTON (Jul. 17, 2014) — Members of the Leahy family pose for a photo beside a painting of Fleet Adm. William Leahy, Jul. 17. During World War 2, Fleet Adm. William Leahy was the Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Army and Navy, the President of the United States. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. David Zlotin)

 
Aug 19

USS Constitution: Presence Then, Presence Now

Tuesday, August 19, 2014 5:13 PM

By Cmdr. Sean Kearns
73rd Commanding Officer
USS Constitution

Cmdr. Sean Kearns, 73rd Commanding Officer of USS Constitution

Cmdr. Sean Kearns, 73rd Commanding Officer of USS Constitution

The Chief of Naval Operations’ Guiding Principles (Warfighting First, Operate Forward, Be Ready) were as important and applicable to the early chapters of our Navy’s history as they are today. In the months leading up to our declaration of war against Great Britain, Captain Isaac Hull personally witnessed the rising tension between our Navy and the Royal Navy. As he departed Cherbourg to bring USS Constitution home in January 1812, he was hailed by British ships in the Mediterranean Sea. Upon reaching Washington, D.C., Captain Hull’s suspicions that our country was on a trajectory to war were confirmed. By early-March, Constitution was undergoing a major refit and on June 18, the very day war was declared, Constitution sailed from Washington to Annapolis and received orders to sail to New York to rendezvous with other ships. Less than a month later, Constitution was nearly ambushed by a squadron of five British warships while executing these orders. Captain Hull and his First Lieutenant, Charles Morris, expertly evaded capture in the face of negligible winds and high temperatures in a 57-hour affair July 15-17, 1812 that became known as the “Great Chase.”

 On August 19, Constitution came across one of the five ships she evaded the previous month – HMS Guerriere. The ensuing 35-minute battle with Guerriere resulted in America’s first victory over a ship of the Royal Navy and earned Constitution her famous nickname, “Old Ironsides.” This victory would not have been possible without foresight and attention to world affairs and current events by Captain Hull. Nor would this victory have been possible without Captain Hull’s determination to train his crew in sailing their ship and firing her guns. And, perhaps most-importantly, this victory would not have been possible without the willingness and determination of Captain Hull to sail into harm’s way. This victory embodied principles laid out by John Paul Jones during the American Revolution; these principles live on in the CNO’s Guiding Principles.

One can conduct a cursory review of the events surrounding this chapter in USS Constitution’s history and easily find the Secretary of the Navy’s Four Ps (People, Platforms, Power, and Partnerships). At the time of her construction, USS Constitution was an expression of outer limits of shipbuilding technology; a hull design with a higher length-to-beam ratio for speed, heavy construction employing Southern Live Oak that made “Old Ironsides all but impenetrable, diagonal riders to reduce hogging, and a heavy gun armament. These signature features made for a strong ship that could sail fast and easily defeat ships of equal size. The U.S. Navy of 1812 was, as is the case today, a volunteer force which, because the U.S. Navy certainly offered a better quality of life and more pay than the Royal Navy or many of the merchants, attracted high-quality Sailors. Without the best and brightest Sailors or Captain Hull’s leadership, Constitution could never have served her long and distinguished career. After the War of 1812, Constitution would serve the Navy as a tool for diplomacy and partnership. From 1844 to 1846, the ship sailed around the world; her feats during this voyage include transporting the U.S. Minister to Brazil, rescuing hostages from Da Nang, and impressing the Hawaiian King Kamehameha with a demonstration of the Paixhans guns (precursor to the Dahlgren gun that fired exploding shells). She even received Pope Pius IX – the first Pontiff to ever set foot on sovereign American territory – on August 1, 1849, during her last voyage to the Mediterranean Sea.

For more on the USS Constitution click here.

Action between USS Constitution and HMS Guerriere, August 19, 1812: "In Action" Oil on canvas, 32" x 48", by Michel Felice Corne (1752-1845), depicting the two frigates firing on each other, as Guerriere's mizzen mast goes over the side. Painting in the collections of the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, transferred from the Navy Department in 1869. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives Photograph, K-26254 (Color).

Action between USS Constitution and HMS Guerriere, August 19, 1812: “In Action” Oil on canvas, 32″ x 48″, by Michel Felice Corne (1752-1845), depicting the two frigates firing on each other, as Guerriere’s mizzen mast goes over the side. Painting in the collections of the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, transferred from the Navy Department in 1869. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives Photograph, K-26254 (Color).

 
Aug 15

Welcome USS John Paul Jones and USS Preble

Friday, August 15, 2014 11:00 AM

Rear Adm. Rick Williams

Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

 

Rear Adm. Rick WilliamsThis week historic Pearl Harbor welcomes two new warships to our waterfront: USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) and USS Preble (DDG 88).

Each ship is named for a founder of the U.S. Navy – leaders who made their mark in the Revolutionary War, especially in the case of Jones, and – in Preble’s case – in the war against Barbary pirates.

On the deck of the captured Serapis, John Paul Jones salutes the Bon Homme Richard as it sinks with its colors still flying. (Taken from a print in the John Paul Jones house at Portsmouth)

On the deck of the captured Serapis, John Paul Jones salutes the Bon Homme Richard as it sinks with its colors still flying. (Taken from a print in the John Paul Jones house at Portsmouth)

Two hundred and thirty eight years ago this month, in August of 1776, John Paul Jones was temporarily promoted to Captain and assumed command of the sloop Providence.

He sailed from the Delaware with orders to “cruise against the enemy” off the northeast coast of America, where he captured supply ships, preventing them from reaching the British.

In the next three years he raided off the coast of England, rescued American prisoners of war and defeated enemy ships in some of the most memorable battles in U.S. Navy history.

More than 150 years ago, James Fennimore Cooper said in a Jones biography:

“There can be no question that Paul Jones was a great man … all the cruises of the man indicated forethought, intrepidity, and resources. Certainly, no sea captain under the American flag, Preble excepted, has ever yet equaled him, in these particulars.”

Commodore Edward Preble NHHC

Commodore Edward Preble
NHHC

If John Paul Jones is considered one of the fathers of the Navy, Commodore Edward Preble must be considered another of our founders.

Like Jones, Preble fought with fearless determination.

Two hundred and eleven years ago this month, in August 1803, he sailed the American frigate USS Constitution toward the Mediterranean.

Aboard Constitution and with Marines at his side, Preble led Jefferson’s Navy into Tripoli. He sailed with young men who would become captains in the War of 1812 – Stephen Decatur, James Lawrence, Isaac Hull and David Porter.

Preble defeated the Barbary pirates and established some of the foundations for the modern Navy and demonstrated our nation’s firm commitment to the rescue and return of our prisoners of war.

Between Jones and Preble, there have been ten United States ships named for these great heroes of our Navy. These namesake ships – most of them destroyers – have fought in the Mexican-American war, Civil War, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, Vietnam and in the Middle East.

It is a privilege to welcome USS John Paul Jones and USS Preble to Hawaii. I know you will bring advanced capabilities in radar and weapon systems, including Aegis ballistic missile defense and Navy Integrated Fires, and I’m grateful you’re joining our team. You’ll find a supportive family and many friends at DESRON 31 and MIDPAC. You’ll join other ships with proud namesakes and outstanding records of achievement.

Happily, many of the Sailors and families already serving here in Hawaii will be able to join shipmates aboard one of these fine warships arriving this week.

To USS Preble and USS John Paul Jones: Welcome Aboard and Aloha!

photojjjj

 

 

 
Aug 14

#PartiesMattered: At Japanese Surrender, Truman Authorizes Two-Day Celebration for War-Weary Nation

Thursday, August 14, 2014 1:38 PM
President Harry S. Truman announces the surrender of Japan at the White House Aug. 14, 1945. Accession number: 64-24

President Harry S. Truman announces the surrender of Japan at the White House Aug. 14, 1945.
Accession number: 64-24

 

By Naval History and Heritage Command, Communications and Outreach Division

 Our historical celebration for today is about, well, celebration! It was 69 years ago today, at 7 p.m. Aug. 14, 1945, when President Harry S. Truman told the world the Japanese had surrendered.

“This is the day we have been waiting for since Pearl Harbor,” Truman said that evening from the White House. “This is the day when Fascism finally dies, as we always knew it would.”

To mark the occasion, Truman announced a two-day holiday for Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 15-16, 1945, holidays shared by the allied nations of United Kingdom and Australia.

Why two days? “The reason we are making it two days is because we didn’t get to celebrate for the other,” Truman said, referring to the May 8 Victory in Europe Day.

Truman spoke directly to Federal employees on the need for a two-day holiday: “One of the hardest working groups of war workers during the past four years – and perhaps the least appreciated by the public – has been the Federal employees in Washington and throughout the country. They have carried the day-to-day operations of the government which are essential to the support of our fighting men and to the carrying out the war. On behalf of the nation, I formally express thanks to them.”

He requested all heads of departments, agencies and bureaus throughout government to excuse their employees for Wednesday and Thursday, operating with only skeleton staff.

“I hope all of the employees of government will enjoy this well-deserved – though inadequate – holiday,” Truman said in Press Statement 102.

Truman was quick to make sure all workers – federal, state and private — would get their pay during the 2-day celebration. That evening, he amended Executive Order No. 9240 on the overtime wage compensation regulations to temporarily add V-J Day to the list of time and a half holidays.

Crowd outside the White House after the announcement of the Japanese surrender on Aug. 14, 1945. Accession number: 73-2022

Crowd outside the White House after the announcement of the Japanese surrender on Aug. 14, 1945.
Accession number: 73-2022

And celebrate the nation did. The U.S. had endured four years of food and gasoline rations, recycling home appliances to produce more steel for more ships to be built and sending hundreds of thousands of young men into battle while women went to work in droves to take their place.

So across the country there was much rejoicing, revelry and even riotous behavior as inhibitions dropped with increased imbibing of alcohol. Bands played patriotic songs for impromptu parades, church bells were rung and people danced in the streets. In the garment district of New York, seamstresses threw out bits of fabric and ticker tape that piled up to five inches on the streets below. Women jumped naked into fountains in San Francisco, and crowds surged onto the White House lawn.

It was that evening at Times Square in New York City that Life Magazine photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt snapped the iconic picture of a sailor planting a kiss on a very surprised dental nurse. A Navy photographer snapped this similar picture from a different angle.

US Navy photographer Victor Jorgensen captured a different view of infamous Times Square V-J Day kiss. His photo was published in the New York Times.

US Navy photographer Victor Jorgensen captured a different view of infamous Times Square V-J Day kiss. His photo was published in the New York Times.

Another reason to celebrate was Truman’s approval to reduce inductions of young men into the Armed Forces from 80,000 per month to 50,000 and for only those aged 26 and younger. The draft couldn’t end completely, he explained, since the war department would still need people to cover those who would get relief of long-service men overseas.

“In justice to the millions of men who have given long and faithful service under the difficult and hazardous conditions of the Pacific War and elsewhere overseas a constant flow of replacements to the occupational forces is thought to be imperative,” Truman noted. “Mathematically and morally, no other course of action appears acceptable.”

After two days of near riotous behavior, Truman had another announcement to give to members of the press during an Aug. 16 briefing.

“I have issued a proclamation setting aside Sunday as a day of prayer. After the two days celebration I think we will need the prayer,” Truman said to the laughter of the room.

The proclamation declared “This day is a new beginning in the history of freedom on this earth. Our global victory has come from the courage and stamina and spirit of free men and women united in determination to fight. It has come from millions of peaceful citizens all over the world turned soldiers almost overnight who showed a ruthless enemy that they were not afraid to fight and to die, and that they knew how to win.”

Calling upon the people “of all faiths,” Truman asked his “countrymen to dedicate this day of prayer to the memory of those who have given their lives to make possible our victory.”

Truman warned during an Aug. 16 press briefing there wouldn’t be an official V-J Day until Japan — with more than two million fully armed — formally signed the surrender document. Sadly, he was correct. As Americans were celebrating the end of the war, some members of the Japanese Imperial Army went against Emperor Hirohito’s announcement to put down arms. After surviving years in prisoner of war camps, hundreds of POWs were killed in the days following the Aug. 14 announcement.

Did the president envision V-J Day as a national holiday, the press questioned? Ever pragmatic, Truman said no. “I think they have had their holidays,” he said, referring to the 2-days of celebration. “There is too much to do to declare too many holidays.”

Truman finally got his V-J Day on Sept. 2, 1945 when Japanese officials signed the surrender documents onboard USS Missouri, which was used as the backdrop as a tip to Truman’s home state.

Sixty-nine years later, only one state celebrates what had been V-J Day. Rhode Island recognizes the second Monday in August as the end of World War II, although it is now called Victory Day.

 
Aug 13

#PeopleMatter: Hospitalman John Kilmer Showed Dedication to Marines Until Death

Wednesday, August 13, 2014 2:12 PM

By the Naval History and Heritage Command, Communications and Outreach Division

Today we remember Medal of Honor recipient John Edward Kilmer, a hospital corpsman with the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines during the battle of Bunker Hill in the Korean War.

John Kilmer

A native of Highland Park, Ill., Kilmer was born Aug. 15, 1930, just the beginning of a slew of August dates that would define Kilmer’s life.

By the time Kilmer was in high school, he was living in San Antonio, Texas. The day after turning 17 on Aug. 16, 1947, Kilmer dropped out of high school to join the service at the Navy Recruiting Station in Houston. The Apprentice Seaman, who went by the nickname of Jackie, entered the Hospital Corps School in San Diego, Calif., graduating in 1948 as a Hospital Apprentice. By Sept. 1, 1950, he had been promoted to Hospitalman.

When the Korean War began, Kilmer was stationed on USS Repose nearing the end of his four-year enlistment. Hoping to put his medical expertise to use in the war, he re-enlisted in the Navy in Aug. 1951.

In his picture, he is wearing a dark uniform and a white “dixie cup” cover. His face shows the beginnings of a mustache, grown perhaps to appear older. He stares straight and unsmiling into the camera with just a glint of a challenge in his brown eyes, which might explain why he dropped out of school to join the Navy and then a few years later, after a dispute with a superior officer, asked for a transfer to the Fleet Marine Force.

We will never know the cause of that dispute. But we certainly know its outcome.

Kilmer completed the Field Medical School at Camp Pendleton, Calif., and was transferred to the Third Battalion of the Seventh Marines, deploying with that unit to Korea.

On Aug. 12, 1952, Kilmer’s unit was pinned down under heavy mortar fire while dug into defensive positions well ahead of the main line of resistance. As stated at the Marine Corps History Division website, Kilmer “moved from position to position in the defense works through artillery, mortar, and sniper fire, administered aid to the wounded, and oversaw their evacuation. He was wounded by shrapnel from an exploding mortar round while en route to aid another wounded soldier, but continued on. Kilmer slowly inched his way to the Marine, but once he began to treat the soldier’s wounds, another heavy barrage of mortar fire began. The two men were unprotected from the explosions, and Kilmer unhesitatingly shielded the wounded man from shrapnel with his own body. Kilmer was mortally wounded during the shelling, but thanks to his heroic self-sacrifice, the wounded man lived.”

Kilmer died the following day, Aug. 13, just two days shy of his 22nd birthday. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. According to the citation: Hospitalman John E. Kilmer, “by his great personal valor and gallant spirit of self-sacrifice in saving the life of a comrade, served to inspire all who observed him. His unyielding devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States naval service. He gallantly gave his life for another.”

His mother, Lois Kilmer, accepted the Medal on his behalf June 18, 1953, from Secretary of the Navy Robert B. Anderson. Kilmer was also awarded the Purple Heart, Korean Service Medal and the United Nations Service Medal.

He is buried in San Jose Burial Park in San Antonio, Texas. The Navy Inn at Naval Support Activity Mid-South in Millington, Tenn., was named Kilmer Hall in his honor in January 2003.

 

 
Aug 2

#PeopleMatter – PT 59: The PT Boat You Didn’t Know About

Saturday, August 2, 2014 12:28 PM

From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communications and Outreach Division

PT 59 and her crew, photographed in an unspecified location near VellaLavella and Choiseul, played a key role in the diversionary mission at Choiseul Island in early November 1943.

PT 59 and her crew, photographed in an unspecified location near VellaLavella and Choiseul, played a key role in the diversionary mission at Choiseul Island in early November 1943.

It may have looked like a speedboat, but beware anything that might threaten its mission. Loaded with two twin .50 cal. M2 Browning machine guns, two 40 mm guns (fore and aft) and four single .30 and .50 cal. machine guns, the water craft had the power to destroy any obstacle that got in its way.

That was the power of PT-59. A former Motor Boat Submarine Chaser that was converted into a motor gunboat, PT-59 was about 77 feet long and able to get up to speeds of 45-47 bone jarring miles per hour. Although the craft and crew were capable, its rough ride was a challenge for PT-59’s commanding officer who silently felt every jar after suffering a serious injury on his previous assignment. Despite injuries that could have sent him home, he insisted on staying in the fight and was assigned command of PT-59 in the Solomon Islands.

The commanding officer and crew of PT-59 were put to the test when they were ordered to help evacuate more than 40 Marines of the 1st Parachute Battalion, 1st Marine Parachute Regiment on Nov. 2, 1943, who had been surrounded by Japanese forces on Choiseul Island. Some of these Marines were wounded and one of them died in the skipper’s bunk aboard PT-59 that night.

On the night of Nov. 5-6, PT-59 led three PT boats to Moli Point and Choiseul Bay, where they attacked Japanese barges. During the next week and a half, PT-59 prowled off Choiseul Bay looking for barges. The final action of PT-59’s commanding officer was on the night of November 16–17, when he took PT-59 on what turned out to be an uneventful patrol.

It wasn’t until a doctor directed him to leave PT-59 in mid-November due to numerous health reasons that he gave up command, returned to the U.S. in January of 1944 and underwent a year of physical therapy to overcome his injuries which were likely exacerbated by his service on PT-59. Despite a strong desire to continue to serve, his injuries made that impossible. He resigned from the Navy in 1945 to begin a political career.

The skipper of PT-59 was in fact Lt. John F. Kennedy. We’ve all heard about Kennedy’s first command PT-109, the infamous patrol which was struck by the Japanese destroyer Amagiri on this date, Aug. 2, 71 years ago in 1943 near Kolombangara Island. The collision cut his craft in two, killing two crew members. Kennedy rescued another crew member who was badly injured, despite his own crippling back injury – the injury that finally ended his Naval career and plagued him for the rest of his life.

March 28, 1944; Pacific Ocean; JOHN F. KENNEDY Navy portrait circa World War II. Kennedy and his surviving crew swam to an island a few miles away, and with the help of some local natives and a Coastwatcher, they returned to Rendova PT base in early August of 1943. And from there, Kennedy, the future president of the United States, took command of PT 59.

March 28, 1944; Pacific Ocean; JOHN F. KENNEDY Navy portrait circa World War II.
Kennedy and his surviving crew swam to an island a few miles away, and with the help of some local natives and a Coastwatcher, they returned to Rendova PT base in early August of 1943.
And from there, Kennedy, the future president of the United States, took command of PT 59.

 
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