Dec 4

Impact of Japanese Source Materials on “No One Avoided Danger”: NAS Kaneohe Bay and the Japanese Attacks of 7 December 1941

Friday, December 4, 2015 12:01 AM

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wenger5.indd

Upon the publication of “No One Avoided Danger”: NAS Kaneohe Bay and the Japanese Attacks of 7 December 1941, Naval Institute Press invited me to share some of the observations that my co-authors, Robert J. Cressman and John F. Di Virgilio, and I faced when we researched American and Japanese source materials for our book. This post is intended to illustrate the impact Japanese source materials had on the compilation of “No One Avoided Danger.” Nowhere are the difficulties of writing military history more apparent than in presenting the history of World War II in the Pacific using Japanese source… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Dec 3

From the Archive: Leonardo and the Airship

Thursday, December 3, 2015 12:01 AM

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updisedown

Paging through Naval Institute’s photo archive, one can come across some unexpected and surprising images — ones where you know there has to be some sort of story behind them. Such is the case of the image featured here. The unusual scene shows the Italian airship M.6 floating over the upturned hull of the sunken battleship Leonardo da Vinci with an angle indicator attached to her rudder. How did such a bizarre scene come about? The story is recounted in a 1921 Proceedings article by Lieut. Colonel A. Guidoni of the Italian Navy, in which is excerpted here below: “The night… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Dec 1

Old Ironsides

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 12:01 AM

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10

In the U.S. Naval Institute’s archives I recently found a publicity brochure for Old Ironsides tucked away in a box. Premiering in 1926, the film dramatically conveys the story of the USS Constitution at the Battle of Tripoli. Filmed in magnascope, an early version of widescreen, it follows the adventures of a young man—known only as “the boy”—desperate to join the the Constitution‘s crew. Along the way he is shanghaied, finds love, and gets captured by pirates before ultimately joining the heavy frigate for the infamous battle at Tripoli. Enjoy the climatic battle scene here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90TeKcgBuHk Profits from the opening… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 27

Reminiscences of Captain Winifred Quick Collins

Friday, November 27, 2015 12:01 AM

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Visit of Captain Winifred Quick Collins, Director of Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES) (Robert Knudsen. White House Photographs. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston)

Being the first in anything, especially the first woman, brings with it its own set of problems along with the prestige eventually given by history. Captain Winfred Quick Collins was not only one of the first WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) during World War II; she also was one of the first women commissioned in the regular Navy. Her primary duty during her service was finding a place for herself and the women who followed. Above all she worked to get women accepted. She retired in 1962 as Assistant Chief of Naval Personnel for Women after twenty years of service. Below are… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 26

The First Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 26, 2015 12:01 AM

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SMN Richard H. Hershberger (left) of Conton, Ohio, eats Thanksgiving dinner with Boatswain's Mate First Class Joseph E. Keating (rightt) of Quincy, Massachusetts, aboard the USS Boston on November 24, 1955. USNI Archives.

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation It has pleased Almighty God to prolong our national life another year, defending us with His guardian care against unfriendly designs from abroad and vouchsafing to us in His mercy many and signal victories over the enemy, who is of our own household. It has also pleased our Heavenly Father to favor as well our citizens in their homes as our soldiers in their camps and our sailors on the rivers and seas with unusual health. He has largely augmented our free population by emancipation and by immigration, while… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 19

The Measure of the Sierra Madre

Thursday, November 19, 2015 12:01 AM

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An undated photo of the amphibious BRP Sierra Madre the Philippines have used as an outpost in the South China Sea.

On the 9th of May, 1997, the Philippine Navy’s dilapidated tank landing ship BRP Sierra Madre (LT-57) ran aground on a reef near the Second Thomas Shoal in the Spratly Islands. She was stranded — but good — and it was certain the ship could not be removed under her own power. Six days later, two Chinese frigates are said to have steamed into the area, and to have trained their guns on the stranded hulk. It was alleged that no assistance was offered by the Chinese ships. But supposing they had, their assistance would neither have been desired nor… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 18

Salty Talk

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 12:01 AM

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ST_JanFeb1994

One of the most stirring sights for many of us is a painting of a full-rigged ship with all sails set, surging through a beautiful sea while overhead, puffy clouds proclaim beautiful weather. Such a ship might be displaying more than three dozen sails, comprising more than an acre of canvas aloft, and each of them with its own name.

 
Nov 17

From Our Archives-Tattletales

Tuesday, November 17, 2015 12:01 AM

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Soviety Minsk 117 with Kiev 060 in background, from the deck of the USS South Carolina in the Mediterranean, Fall 1978

The United States Naval Institute has the largest private collection of sea service photographs in the world including some rare Cold War era images. A sizable number of photos of Soviet ships & submarines are within the collection. A sampling of images of Soviet vessels shadowing U.S. Navy ships are below. An example of a war fought without a front line.