Archive for February, 2018

Feb 14

Richard Wainwright: USS Maine survivor & supporter of the Naval Institute

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 12:22 PM

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1849-1926

  When the USS Maine exploded 120 years ago on February 15, 1898, Lieutenant Commander Richard Wainwright, one of the Naval Institute’s staunchest supporters, was the Maine’s executive officer. Fortunately, he survived. Wainwright’s numerous contributions to Proceedings magazine began as early as 1882. He continued writing and contributing to Proceedings until his final article, “The Dacia Dilemma”, was published in August 1925 not long before he passed in 1926. Wainwright explored a variety of topics including the Graydon torpedo thrower, Fleet Tactics, The Naval Defense of the United Kingdom, Navy Coast Signals, The Merchant Marine, Gun-Making, Search Curves, and Speed… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 8

A Deeper Dive into Hell to Pay

Thursday, February 8, 2018 12:01 AM

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9781682471654

In 2009, D. M. Giangreco’s award-winning book Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945–1947 was published by the Naval Institute Press. We recently spoke with Mr. Giangreco about his latest book—a revised and expanded edition of Hell to Pay (Naval Institute Press, 2017). Naval History: Tell us about the expanded edition of Hell to Pay. D. M. Giangreco: The new Hell to Pay expands on several areas examined in the previous book and deals with three new topics: U.S.-Soviet cooperation in the war against imperial Japan; U.S., Soviet, and Japanese plans for the invasion and defense… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 6

Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate Carl Maxie Brashear, the U.S. Navy’s First African American Master Diver

Tuesday, February 6, 2018 12:01 AM

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Master Chief Boatswain's Mate Carl M. Brashear, USN (Ret.) (1931-2006)

Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate Carl Maxie Brashear (1931-2006) used a rare combination of grit, determination, and persistence to overcome formidable hurdles to become the first black master diver in the U.S. Navy. His race was an obstacle, as were his origin on a sharecropper’s farm in rural Kentucky and the modest amount of education he received there. But these were not his greatest challenges. He was held back by an even bigger factor: In 1966 his left leg was amputated just below the knee because he was badly injured on a salvage operation. After the amputation, the Navy sought to… Read the rest of this entry »