Archive for March, 2018

Mar 29

Flying the Rubber Cows

Thursday, March 29, 2018 10:54 AM

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A kite balloon, viewed from the deck of a battleship ca. World War I. Naval Institute Photo Archive

This article by Alan L. Morse originally appeared in the February 1984 issue of Proceedings. What’s in a nickname? Today’s Goodyear Blimp was named after the fat, fictitious British Army Colonel Blimp. But one of its ancestors – the World War I kite balloon – was whimsically christened the “rubber cow,” and went to sea tethered to a “tin can.” They were the least glamorous of World War I pilots. Their aircraft were unlovely, unromantic, uncomfortable, and unpowered. They fought no aerial duels with the Red Baron or skimmed the trees on reconnaissance missions. These pilots never fired a shot… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 27

The Naval Act of 1794: Piracy and the U.S. Navy’s Re-Birth

Tuesday, March 27, 2018 3:00 PM

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Painting of the USS Constitution, the first ship completed after the re-establishment of the Navy.

I learned something today, dear reader. For nine long years, the United States didn’t have a Navy. Nine years! Between August 1785 and 27 March 1794, there were no Naval officers, nor sailors, not even a single ship to the Navy’s name. Yes, today is the anniversary of the rebirth of the United States Navy, and it is all thanks to pirates. At the end of the Revolutionary War in August 1785, Congress sold the last Continental Navy ship, the Alliance. There just simply wasn’t enough money available to maintain a ship or support a naval force. Moreover, the United… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 26

Key Dates in U. S. Military LGBT Policy

Monday, March 26, 2018 9:26 PM

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President Barack Obama signs the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010, Wednesday, Dec. 22, 2010, at the Interior Department in Washington. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

March 11, 1778 – Lieutenant Gotthold Frederick Enslin becomes the first documented service member to be dismissed from the U.S. military for homosexuality. Under an order from General George Washington which states “abhorrence and detestation of such infamous crimes,” Lt. Enslin is drummed out of the Continental Army after being found guilty of sodomy. March 1, 1917 – The Articles of War of 1916 are implemented. A revision of the Articles of War of 1806, the new regulations detail statutes governing U.S. military discipline and justice. Under the category Miscellaneous Crimes and Offences, Article 93 states that any person subject to military law… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 20

Celebrating Women’s History Month

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 12:24 PM

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Captain Winifred Quick Collins

  I’ve enjoyed reading the oral history of Captain Winifred Quick Collins during Women’s History Month. Captain Collins dedicated her career to the advancement of women in the Navy, and her reminiscences reveal the many obstacles she overcame as we progressed toward a more inclusive Navy. Collins was among the first officers accepted when the WAVES were established in 1942; one of the first female officers commissioned in the regular Navy, which happened in 1948; and at the top of her profession as the only woman line captain at the end of her career. She was selected for the Navy experience as the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 17

Today in Submarine History

Saturday, March 17, 2018 12:01 AM

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Feature

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day we remember the Irish-born John Phillip Holland and the Holland IV. 1898: John P. Holland’s submarine, Holland IV, performs the first successful diving and surfacing tests off Staten Island, New York. Read more about Holland and his submarines here. https://www.navalhistory.org/2012/03/17/uss-holland-ss-1-makes-her-first-successful-submerged-run-17-march-1898   Another anniversary, 1959: USS Skate (SSN-578) becomes the first submarine to surface at the North Pole, traveling 3,000 miles in and under Arctic ice for more than a month. Read more about the USS Skate here. https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/1984-06/us-navy-sailing-under-ice

 
Mar 15

Seaplanes Go To War

Thursday, March 15, 2018 12:01 AM

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PBY Catalina Sights IJN Fleet 6/42 by John Hamilton

World War II for the flying boats started sooner than many. PBY Catalinas and PBM Mariners, a newer flying boat built to complement the PBY, were sent to Iceland, Newfoundland, Bermuda, and other bases as part of the Neutrality Patrol where they searched for German U-Boats. In May of 1941, Lieutenant Leonard Smith was helping train RAF pilots in PBY operations when he took part in a mission that spotted the German battleship Bismarck, which led to its sinking. The seaplanes escorted the Marine contingent to Iceland in July of the same year.[1] When hostilities commenced, the seaplanes were there…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 13

USCG Helos to the Rescue (Part 3)

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 10:13 AM

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2a

On 15 February1943, Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Ernest J. King assigned responsibility for sea-going development of helicopters to the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard has proven time and time again that the helicopter is a unique instrument for the saving of human lives.” Here are some of the important missions flown by the service’s helicopters. ‘Yes, I Can’ The first life-saving mission by a Coast Guard rescue swimmer took place on 10 December 1987. At 1936 the Bluebird, a 26-foot fishing vessel requested assistance. The duty helicopter crew at Coast Guard Air Station Sitka, Alaska, quickly boarded HH–3F… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 8

12 People You Didn’t Know Were U.S. Marines

Thursday, March 8, 2018 10:18 PM

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Marines - Drew Carey

12. Rob Riggle The comedian and actor Rob Riggle who appeared on Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show and dozens of films sitcoms and commercials retired as a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve in 2013. His deployments included tours in Kosovo and Afghanistan. 11. Bea Arthur Actress Bea Arthur enjoyed a successful career playing acerbic characters on the TV series Maude and The Golden Girls. During WWII under her birth name Bernice Frankel, she served in the USMC as a truck driver and typist. Oddly, in her later years she would deny that she was a Marine…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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