Archive for July, 2018

Jul 31

Today in Naval History: The Four Ships Named USS Intrepid

Tuesday, July 31, 2018 1:43 PM

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Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum (Acroterion)

On this day in 1874, the USS Intrepid, second ship of her name, was commissioned by the U.S. Navy. The name Intrepid means fearless or adventurous, both things this mighty ship was not. Despite the cutting edge technology and new designs used to create the massive ship, she proved merely experimental. The Intrepid was the Navy’s first ship equipped with self-propelled torpedoes and led the way for future ships of more efficient and useful designs. Her predecessor, the USS Intrepid (1798) has a peculiar and distinguished history. Captured from the Tripolitan Navy several months after the USS Philadelphia ran aground, the first Intrepid was converted to a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 30

The Sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis

Monday, July 30, 2018 12:47 PM

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The USS Indianapolis (CA-35) before the war in September 1939. (Photo: NHHC)

At roughly 0015 on July 30, 1945 the USS Indianapolis (CA-35) was struck by two torpedoes from the Japanese submarine I-58 in the Philippine Sea. The ship was on a highly classified mission, to deliver various parts needed to finish the field construction of the atomic bomb “Little Boy” on Tinian Island. Only a little more than two weeks from the surrender of Japan, the sinking of the Indianapolis was one of the last major naval events of World War II. Once struck, it took only 12 minutes to sink, which was not enough time for a distress signal to… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 27

This Day in History – July 27th, 1953

Friday, July 27, 2018 10:35 AM

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Korean War Armistice with North Korean, Chinese, and American leaders.

The Armistice between the United States, South Korea, and North Korea that ended the Korean War was signed on July 27th, 1953. The Armistice marked the end of three years of bloodshed, setting terms and conditions that were meant to be temporary. It was to be followed by legislators and diplomats to settle the question of Korean statehood. Military leaders from each of the combatant countries oversaw the talks. Field Marshall Peng Dehuai was the representative from the People’s Republic of China, Lieutenant General William Kelly Harrison was the United States’, and General Nam Il was the People’s Democratic Republic… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 26

The National Security Act and Inter-Service Rivalry

Thursday, July 26, 2018 3:09 PM

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President Harry Truman signing the National Act into law on July 26, 1946.  The act would not go into effect until September 18 of that year. (Photo: Department of State)

On this day in 1947 President Harry Truman signed into law the National Security Act of 1947. The bill reorganized the military, by placing the Army and Navy into the Department of Defense, and creating the position of Secretary of Defense at its head. It also created the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Council. However, it seems the most impactful act from the bill, was establishment of a new branch of the military; the United States Air Force. Upon its inception, the Air Force began a campaign designed to downplay the significance of the Navy, especially aircraft carriers,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 26

Story Time with ’72: Meal Time Shenanigans

Thursday, July 26, 2018 12:01 AM

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  During Plebe Summer the mantra “just make it to the next meal” is not uncommon as meals provide a small break from the physical nature of the summer. Today during the academic year rivalry weeks when the Midshipmen are slated to play Air Force or Army King Hall becomes a place of danger for upper class who are tough on plebes. Food and water goes flying through the air to ruin the uniforms of the upperclassman and many others end up getting caught in the crossfire. The members of the Class of ’72 recall similar things happening during their… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 25

Farragut and Grant: The First “Four-stars”

Wednesday, July 25, 2018 11:13 AM

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At the time of Farragut's promotion to Admiral, the sleeve insignia for Admirals was not standardized.  They often added extra stripes in order to show their seniority and prominence before a formal insignia system was established later on. (Photo: Library of Congress)

On July 25, 1866 David Glasgow Farragut became the first four-star Admiral in this nation’s history. Concurrently, the Army promoted Ulysses S. Grant to the rank of “General of the Army,” which was also a four-star rank. Up until this point the nation had nine Rear Admirals and one Vice Admiral, as well as Brigadier, Major, and Lieutenant Generals. Upon Farragut’s promotion David Porter was promoted to Vice Admiral. Except for the various five-star officers of World War II and Korea, and Pershing’s “General of the Armies” rank, four-star officers are the most senior leadership in the armed forces since… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 24

Day 2- March 17, 2018- Honolulu

Tuesday, July 24, 2018 12:01 AM

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Lieutenant Leroy Fadem recently revisited sites in the Pacific where he saw action in the Navy during the tumultuous years of the War in the Pacific over 70 years ago. This is a journal of that recent trip as kept by his son, Steven Fadem, who accompanied Lt. Fadem on that journey of rediscovery. The darkness out our window slowly fades to gray as the first rays of sunrise illuminate the palm trees silhouetted against a still ocean. This is a very different Honolulu than existed on the morning of December 7, 1941. It was a quiet Sunday morning in a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 20

The USS Essex From Mutiny to F-35s

Friday, July 20, 2018 12:01 AM

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Artist's rendition of the Battle of Valparaiso, depicting naval warfare between the frigate USS Essex, the HMS Phoebe, and the HMS Cherub. The battle raged for two and a half hours, ending with the surrender of the USS Essex. (Photo: USNI Archive)

As reported by USNI News, the USS Essex quietly deployed last Tuesday, 10 July. [Essex Amphibious Ready Group Quietly Deployed on Tuesday with Marine F-35s] The lack of “fanfare” was for “reasons of operational security”, according to USNI sources. The USS Essex is carrying the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit and their F-35s. However, this isn’t the first time a US Navy ship named USS Essex made headlines. There were five ships named USS Essex in U.S. Navy history, starting with the 32-gun sailing frigate commissioned in 1799. On 9 December 1813, the sailors of USS Essex staged a mutiny. Luckily, CAPT Porter… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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