Archive for July, 2018

Jul 15

Sailors Scream For Ice Cream!

Sunday, July 15, 2018 12:05 PM

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Sailors get ready to enjoy some ice cream and cake. (U.S. Naval Institute)

Few things are as important as coffee, tobacco, and ice cream in today’s Navy. Though coffee offers caffeine to get through long days and the tobacco provides opportunity for smoke breaks, ice cream acts on a separate level of physiological necessity. There are physiological studies that demonstrate ice cream is a “comfort” food that ranks above all others [1]. Aside from being the only food to lower the human startle response, the frozen treat is thought to invoke nostalgia that reminds individuals, especially those on long demanding deployments, of childhood innocence and security, and of family vacations that may be relaxing [1]…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 13

Drink to the Foam: The Navy’s Extensive History with Alcohol

Friday, July 13, 2018 12:01 AM

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Officers share a rare beer on board USS Saratoga after a strike raid (1943).

If you decided to sign up as a seaman in the U.S. Navy 156 ago today, you would have found a “gill of spirits”– about a quarter pint of hard liquor– included in your daily food ration. The day after swearing in, however, you may have wound up disappointed: on 14 July 1862, Congress passed a law which banned spirit rations and required sailors to purchase their own liquor. Sailors were compensated with a 5-cent increase in daily pay. Congress’ abolition of the spirit rations marks an early episode in the tumultuous, centuries-long relationship between alcohol and the U.S. Sea… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 10

5 Little Known Facts About Gettysburg

Tuesday, July 10, 2018 12:01 AM

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The Battle of Gettysburg

The Battle of Gettysburg is commonly known as the battle that changed the course of the Civil war. Most people know the general location of Gettysburg; they know who the combatants were; everyone knows the outcome of the battle. However, there are some things that most people do not know. Below are 5 things that may surprise you about the Battle of Gettysburg.   1. General Meade’s Command General Meade was the commander of the Union army during the Battle of Gettysburg. He was a brilliant officer and was respected by his troops. Few know that Meade was given command… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 5

9 Fascinating Navy Aircraft You Didn’t Know Existed

Thursday, July 5, 2018 12:01 AM

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In 2018, over a century after the United States utilized military aircraft in combat for the first time, Naval Aviation constitutes an invaluable instrument of expeditious fire and fury during times of war. Advanced fighter and reconnaissance aircraft allow the U.S. Navy to see farther, shoot faster, and fight fiercer than its adversaries over both sea and land. However, the U.S. Navy did not arrive at its current state of aeronautical eminence without a great deal of trial and error. Along the way, the United States developed a number of aircraft that appear bizarre, improbable, or downright impractical. The most fascinating of… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 4

Citizen Soldiers

Wednesday, July 4, 2018 12:01 AM

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Uncle Sam

It’s time to celebrate civilians and the contributions they made to the American war effort! 1. Clarissa “Clara” Harlowe Barton (Civil War) “I may be compelled to face danger, but never fear it, and while our soldiers can stand and fight, I can stand and feed and nurse them.” Clara Barton risked her life during the Civil War to bring aid and supplies to wounded soldiers. Initially, she collected and distributed supplies for the Union Army, but then decided to take a more active role. She began in Fredericksburg, Virginia in 1862 serving as an independent nurse. She earned the name:… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 3

The Ship That Would Not Die

Tuesday, July 3, 2018 12:01 AM

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Captain Frank A. Manson

Frank Manson was commissioned in the Naval Reserve in 1942 and went through the naval training school at Ithaca, New York, before he transferred to the regular Navy on 7 May 1947. He attained the rank of captain before retiring on 1 January 1969. Ordered to duty afloat in 1944, Manson joined the USS Laffey (DD-724). On 16 April 1945, the Laffey suffered heavy casualties following a concentrated Japanese aerial attack in which she was struck by bombs and kamikaze attacks. For services in the Laffey, Manson received a letter of commendation, with authorization to wear the commendation ribbon with combat “V,” and… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 2

Women in Aviation: an Uplifting Tradition

Monday, July 2, 2018 3:22 PM

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(Photo: National Archives Catalog)

On the anniversary of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance, we remember the women who made female aviation possible. Eighty-one years ago today, Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific Ocean during an attempt to circumnavigate the globe. In a society where women’s capacities to physically and mentally cope with the rigors of aviation faced heavy scrutiny, Earhart overcame barriers and established new standards to pave the way for women in the field. After first flying in an airplane in 1920, she worked odd jobs to purchase her own aircraft and received an international pilot’s license in 1923. Earhart set about breaking altitude and… Read the rest of this entry »