Archive for August, 2018

Aug 31

The Cartoonist Who Predicted Pearl Harbor

Friday, August 31, 2018 8:31 AM

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Featured in comics, novels, radio programs and film serials, Don Winslow of the Navy attracted legions of fans throughout the 1930s and 1940s. The character was created by a former crime reporter, naval intelligence officer and FBI agent named Frank V. Martinek. Although he surely enjoyed the commercial success of Don Winslow, Martinek was in part motived to develop the character because he had been frustrated with the public’s indifference to his dire warnings of an inevitable war with Japan. The creative process that resulted in Don Winslow began when Martinek worked as a young crime reporter for the Chicago… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 28

A Sailor’s Best Friend: Dogs in the Military

Tuesday, August 28, 2018 11:17 AM

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Mascot Card for U.S. Navy Mascot Apache

While working on the U.S. Naval Institute’s photo digitization project, I happened upon a folder of photographs filled with something that always brings joy to my heart: Dogs! It may be a few days after the official National Dog Day, but for dog lover’s, every day is for the dogs, and I thought I’d use today to share some history on dogs in the military. We know that dogs have been keeping us company since before 10,000 BCE. By becoming our companions, dogs also became our allies against our enemies, whether they be the animals early man hunted, or men… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 24

Historic Site: Harbor View Memorial Park

Friday, August 24, 2018 2:46 PM

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USS Tennessee Memorial, Harbor View Memorial Park, San Pedro, CA

While we recall the wreck of the USS Memphis (ACR-10) which occurred on August 29, 1916 killing 43 crew members, let’s remember a lesser known tragedy that occurred aboard the ship when she was known by her original name, Tennessee.   Inscription: George Wood (-1908) Watertender U.S. A Reinhold (-1908) M.M. 2.C. S. W. Meek (-1908) F. 1.C. E. C. Boccs (-1908)F. 2.C. F. S. Maxfield (-1908)F. 2.C. J. P. A. Carroll (-1908)F. 2.C. E. J. Burns (-1908) C.P. Died Heroically at Their Stations, In Line of Duty, USS Tennessee (ACR-10), June, 1908, Erected by Shipmates

 
Aug 21

Day 3- March 17/18 Honolulu to Saipan, via Guam

Tuesday, August 21, 2018 12:01 AM

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Lieutenant Leroy Fadem recently revisited sites in the Pacific where he saw action in the Navy during the tumultuous years of the War in the Pacific over 70 years ago. This is a journal of that recent trip as kept by his son, Steven Fadem, who accompanied Lt. Fadem on that journey of rediscovery. Back in 1944 when Dad traveled from Honolulu to Guam on the Stevens it took over a week at sea. Today we made the journey in a little over eight hours, with two meals, some wine, a movie and air conditioning. The juxtaposition is stunning. The world… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 16

U.S. Marines in Nicaragua, 1927-1932

Thursday, August 16, 2018 12:01 AM

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Marines on Patrol (USMC History Division)

The Second Nicaragua intervention of 1927-1932 marks a unique and very interesting chapter in Marine Corps history. Marines were dispatched to the Central American republic to support democracy by supervising a contentious presidential election and building an apolitical internal security force, the Guardia Nacional, that could take over from the Marines and police their own country. However, U.S. Marines soon found themselves deep in the jungles, manning lonely posts and on the trail chasing elusive rebels that refused to honor a political process they saw as being tampered with by meddlesome foreigners. Many innovations were developed and countless lessons were… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 14

Today in Naval History: The Capture of the U.S. Brig Argus by H.M Brig Pelican

Tuesday, August 14, 2018 10:15 AM

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Kimball Argus Burning commerce

Two hundred and five years ago today, on 14 August 1813, the U.S. Brig Argus, under command of Captain William H. Allen, fought her final battle with the HMS Pelican off the coast of England during the War of 1812. During the early-morning battle, Allen’s right leg was shot off, but he remained on station until fainting from a loss of blood. As Pelican‘s men boarded, Argus struck her colors. Allen died four days later. Writing about the incident in the May 1939 issue of Proceedings, Prof. Wilbur E. Apgar gave a thorough summary of the events. His summary is excerpted here. The amazing lack of concern… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 10

Past as Prologue in US-Mexican Relations

Friday, August 10, 2018 12:01 AM

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Gen Scott's grand entry into the city of Mexico, Sept. 14th, 1847

U.S. national security relations with Mexico stretch back to the 1840s and the presidency of James K. Polk, when the United States wanted to expand the country’s size. Polk was explicit about his policy goals, one of which was the annexation of California,[1] and he viewed his election as a mandate to annex that territory, as well as others if the opportunity arose. That opportunity materialized when Mexico tried to retake Texas[2]. Polk, without hesitation, convinced Congress to declare war on Mexico. President Polk accomplished more than what his constituents expected. Today, the United States shares an open border with… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 9

9 Most Insane Quotes from Military Dictators

Thursday, August 9, 2018 12:01 AM

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Benito Mussolini: 1922-1943 Quote: “Let us have a dagger between our teeth, a bomb in our hands, and an infinite scorn in our hearts.” Joseph Stalin: 1925-1953 Quote: “It is enough that the people know there was an election. The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything.”   Adolf Hitler: 1933-1945 Quote: “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” Mao Zedong: 1949-1976 Quote: “Communism is not love. Communism is a hammer which we use to crush the enemy.” Francois Duvalier: 1957-1971 Quote: “God… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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