Author Archive

Jun 22

First SOSUS signal at Cape Hatteras – June 1962

Friday, June 22, 2018 3:21 PM

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A view of the Cape Hatteras lighthouse from the beach. (National Park Service)

I started to feel a little nostalgic when I found out that the first SOSUS signal of a Soviet diesel submarine was detected by the Cape Hatteras Naval Facility (NAVFAC) on June 26, 1962. Like many other women naval officers who launched their careers in the Cold War era, SOSUS was one of the few real ‘operational’ billets available to us, so we requested and got orders to the ‘Naval Facilities’ to begin our careers as watch officers for what was a secret but highly successful cold war antisubmarine warfare asset at the time. Our job was to monitor, detect, hold… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 20

Celebrating Women’s History Month

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 12:24 PM

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Captain Winifred Quick Collins

  I’ve enjoyed reading the oral history of Captain Winifred Quick Collins during Women’s History Month. Captain Collins dedicated her career to the advancement of women in the Navy, and her reminiscences reveal the many obstacles she overcame as we progressed toward a more inclusive Navy. Collins was among the first officers accepted when the WAVES were established in 1942; one of the first female officers commissioned in the regular Navy, which happened in 1948; and at the top of her profession as the only woman line captain at the end of her career. She was selected for the Navy experience as the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 14

Richard Wainwright: USS Maine survivor & supporter of the Naval Institute

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 12:22 PM

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1849-1926

  When the USS Maine exploded 120 years ago on February 15, 1898, Lieutenant Commander Richard Wainwright, one of the Naval Institute’s staunchest supporters, was the Maine’s executive officer. Fortunately, he survived. Wainwright’s numerous contributions to Proceedings magazine began as early as 1882. He continued writing and contributing to Proceedings until his final article, “The Dacia Dilemma”, was published in August 1925 not long before he passed in 1926. Wainwright explored a variety of topics including the Graydon torpedo thrower, Fleet Tactics, The Naval Defense of the United Kingdom, Navy Coast Signals, The Merchant Marine, Gun-Making, Search Curves, and Speed… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 10

January 10, 1943 – USS Trigger (SS-237) sinks Japanese destroyer Okikaze

Wednesday, January 10, 2018 12:28 PM

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The USS Trigger fresh from the builder's yard at Mare Island.

It was 75 years ago today, that the USS Trigger (SS-237)  torpedoed and sank the Japanese destroyer Okikaze. The following is a description of the event taken from the Trigger’s third war patrol report:

 
Dec 6

The Christmas Ship

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 12:38 PM

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Santa Clause distributing packages to children on board the USS Antares on Christmas Day, 1931

The Christmas Ship By Admiral Hugh Rodman, U.S. Navy (Retired) The following item is from the New York Times of December 23, 1930 and was re-published in Proceedings magazine in 1931. Washington, December 22 (AP)—Hundreds of happy children shouting from the decks of Uncle Sam’s warships will greet their seagoing Santa Claus as he climbs aboard with his bag on Christ­mas morning. About 63,000 officers and men will spend Christ­mas this year aboard naval vessels. Far from home and their own children, the personnel of battleships and aircraft carriers have softened the homesick feeling by giving Christmas parties to the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 22

Old but Still Going Strong: The Oldest Navy Assets Still in Use

Wednesday, November 22, 2017 4:53 PM

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USS Constitution underway in 2012

The U.S. Navy has always been an innovator. It pioneered the Global Positioning System, developed nuclear propulsion, and deployed the first operational laser weapon. The recently commissioned USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is brimming with bleeding-edge technology. Its stealth design, Integrated Power System, and long-range gun firing capabilities make it the most sophisticated ship in the world. Likewise, the lead ship in the new carrier class USS Gerald R Ford (CVN-78) features many technological advances including an electromagnetic aircraft launch system. However, the Department of the Navy is not always in a rush to phase out and replace assets that continue to… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 30

The Story He Never Told

Tuesday, May 30, 2017 12:01 AM

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9781612518480

The year following my grandfather’s death in 1975, I found myself in a mystifying place: the NAS Patuxent River airfield dedication in his honor. The ceremony touched on highlights from Vice Admiral Frederick “Trap” Trapnell’s long career in naval aviation, which, even to my untrained ear, sounded consequential: getting the Hellcat into WWII, salvaging the development of the Corsair, first Navy pilot to fly a jet, guiding the Navy through the complex transition to jets, establishing the Test Pilot School at PAX River. Why else would they name the airfield after him? Yet, standing there on the rain-soaked tarmac of… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 27

A Letter From a Captain to His Son

Friday, May 27, 2016 12:01 AM

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Naval Institute photo archive

Today, 27 May 2016, the Class of 2016 will be graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy. The Naval Institute shares the words of a commanding officer to his son on the occasion of his son’s graduation from the Naval Academy in June, 1955. As today’s graduates enter commissioned service, these words of sixty years ago ring true. To the Class of 2016, the Naval Institute extends heartfelt congratulations.

 
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