Author Archive

Jun 18

Property of Frank H. Wilson

Thursday, June 18, 2015 8:39 AM

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During my first summer at USNI as photo researcher, I made a friend. Actually, this friend does not work here or anywhere else. His name is Frank H. Wilson, a Chief Photographer for the U.S. Navy. Incidentally he served from 1911 to 1945. So yes, he is no longer with us, but he does live on in our archives.

 
May 28

Free Time!

Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:20 PM

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As I search through the USNI Archives and Navy.mil for photos I am struck by the truth of “the more things change the more things stay the same.” From onboard entertainment to onshore sight seeing today’s sailors continue to follow in their predecessors’ footsteps. Beginning with Liberty,  

 
Jul 31

Timeline to Justice – the quest to restore honor to the Captain and Crew of the USS Indianapolis

Thursday, July 31, 2014 4:00 PM

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    The following article was printed in the July/August 1998 issue of Naval History magazine. It was written by 12-year old Hunter Scott in his quest to restore honor to the Captain and Crew of the USS Indianapolis:   With perhaps greater reverence than many of my 12-year-old peers, I appreciate this opportunity to write about what has grown from a school history project into a mission. My quest has allowed me to be associated with individuals who fought so that all Americans could live in the greatest democracy the world has ever known. Throughout this journey, I have learned… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 23

Remembering the USS Squalus 75 years later.

Friday, May 23, 2014 1:00 AM

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On May 23, 1939, the USS Squalus was tragically lost at sea off the coast of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Twenty-six lives were lost, thirty-three were saved. The story as told by Carl la Vo in The Short Life of the Squalus follows. (originally published in the Spring 1988 issue of Naval History magazine) Forty-seven years after his miraculous rescue, Oliver F. Naquin walked into Baltimore’s Master Host Inn two summers ago. Inside, veterans of the World War II submarines Sailfish (SS-192) and Sculpin (SS-191) mingled. Most were people unfamiliar to the then 83-year-old retired rear admiral. But among them were six… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 5

First Catapult Launch: November 5, 1915

Tuesday, November 5, 2013 8:38 AM

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On November 5, 1915, Lt.Comdr. Henry C. Mustin, in an AB-2 flying boat, made the first catapult launching from a ship, flying off the stern of the USS North Carolina (ACR 12) in Pensacola, Fl. View NHHC’s Facebook Photo Album for this event: http://goo.gl/VaBTHC This and other historic photographs are available in the Naval Institute’s on-line photo gallery: photos.usni.org For research or sales assistance call (410) 905-7212 or email [email protected]

 
Oct 24

The U.S. Coast Guard in Grenada

Thursday, October 24, 2013 12:38 PM

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It is the anniversary of the invasion of Grenada which took place 30 years ago. The following article, The Guard in Grenada by Dale L. Thompson was first published in Naval Institute Proceedings in November, 1984. In late October 1983, Grenada was torn by internal revolution. Its Marxist government had come apart, and conditions of anarchy and bloody repression were reported. Concerns for the lives of the U. S. citizens on the island and for stability in that portion of the Caribbean led to the 25 October rescue mission. The invasion force contained personnel from all the U. S. services and six other Caribbean… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 23

Beirut Marine Barracks bombing: October 23, 1983

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 3:49 PM

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Thirty years ago today, two truck bombs struck seperate buildings housing U.S. Marines and French forces, members of the Multinational Force in Lebanon, and killed 299 American & French servicemen. 220 U.S. Marines & 18 Sailors were among the casualties. This was the deadliest day in Marine Corps history since Iwo Jima. The following article, Navy-Marine Corps Team in Lebanon by Lieutenant Colonel David Evins, U.S. Marine Corps, is from the May 1984 issue of Proceedings magazine. On 6 June 1982, the Israeli Army crossed the border into southern Lebanon. One hundred thousand troops swept north , backed up by the Israelis… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Sep 16

Remembering my time on Kwajalein by Leonard "Jack" Meyerson

Monday, September 16, 2013 9:25 AM

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  The following interesting memoir was submitted by Leonard “Jack” Meyerson, Seaman 1st Class: The 74th Naval Construction Battalion had been waiting on Kwajalein Atoll for three months. The landing strip we had built was perfect, the structures we had erected were occupied, and the air base was operating efficiently. There was absolutely nothing for us to do but wait. Someone in the chain of command had forgotten we could be taken off the coral atoll and that the war was passing us by. We envied the Army Air Forces personnel who occupied the base that we had built for… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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