Author Archive

Apr 25

Farragut’s Fleet Takes New Orleans after Dash Upriver

Saturday, April 25, 2015 8:00 AM

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From the Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division When you read about Vice Adm. David G. Farragut, it is most likely in terms of his being lashed to the mast of USS Hartford during the Battle of Mobile Bay in 1865. It was during this Civil War naval battle the legendary leader was credited with saying: “Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!” This blog, however, isn’t about the sound bite that made Farragut famous. This is how Farragut’s leadership and tediously detailed planning and reconnaissance resulted in one of the great Union naval victories of the Civil… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 24

John Paul Jones Comes Home to the U.S. Naval Academy

Friday, April 24, 2015 8:00 AM

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From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division Legendary Continental Navy Capt. John Paul Jones was famous for his retort, “I have not yet begun to fight,” upon being asked to surrender his sinking and burning Bonhomme Richard to HMS Serapis. At the end of the fight, it was Jones who was victorious. Jones struggled to find relevancy following the end of the American Revolution, with a less-than-stellar stint as an admiral in the Russian Imperial Navy. He begged the United States to give him an appointment, but that young republic had disbanded its navy. When he died… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 21

After WWII Ends, Some Japanese Soldiers Carry On the Fight

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 8:00 AM

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By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric Lockwood, Naval History and Heritage Command When do you think the Second World War ended? One might say Aug. 9, 1945, after the US dropped the second atomic bomb. The war had been decided after that. Another commonly said day would be a few days later on Aug. 15, when Japan announced they would no longer fight and would formally surrender. A third date might be Sept. 2, when representatives of the Empire of Japan officially signed the Japanese Instrument of Surrender aboard USS Missouri (BB 63) in Tokyo Bay. Whatever the date,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 15

Bainbridge Launches as 1st Nuclear-Powered Destroyer

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 7:50 AM

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From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division When the warship slipped into the frigid waters at Quincy, Mass., 54 years ago, there was a lot riding within the ship’s broad beam. The guided missile destroyer leader Bainbridge, launched on April 15, 1961, was the first nuclear-powered destroyer. The ceremony was held just 10 miles from where the ship’s namesake: Commodore William Bainbridge, was superintendent of the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston. The destroyer would be the fourth ship named after the commodore, infamous as the commander of USS Philadelphia, captured by the Barbary pirates and imprisoned for… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 12

USS Theodore Roosevelt Kicks off Operation Deny Flight

Sunday, April 12, 2015 7:23 AM

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By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric Lockwood, Naval History and Heritage Command Communication and Outreach Division  When the provinces and states within the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia began to seek independence in 1991 from the culturally-diverse soup of the region known as the Balkans, it was like having the peas and carrots fighting the celery and potatoes. The United Nations got involved to keep the fighting from boiling up into the airspace that encompassed an area roughly the size of New England plus the eastern half of New York. But their efforts to police the airspace mostly… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 11

Naval Battles of the American Revolutionary War

Saturday, April 11, 2015 3:21 PM

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By Joshua L. Wick, Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division Despite the success of the fledgling Continental Navy during the American Revolution the ending of the war actually brought an end to our nation’s first navy. A few months after the British defeat at the Battle of Yorktown Oct. 19, 1781, the British Parliament made its first overtures to the United States to begin peace talks the following spring. Nearly a year later, the Confederation Congress issued a proclamation on this date (April 11) in 1783, “declaring the cessation of arms” against Great Britain, which had passed… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 1

Operation Iceberg — Okinawa Invasion in 1945

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 1:33 PM

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By Joshua L. Wick, Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division Editor’s Note: The following photos tell just a brief story of the U.S. Navy’s involvement during the Okinawa Invasion and Battle of Okinawa. One of the unique items NHHC has in its archives is an oral history of Cmdr. Frederick J. Becton, commanding officer of destroyer USS Laffey (DD-724), which saw action during the Okinawa operations. To read Cmdr. Becton’s interview click here. All the photos below are courtesy of NHHC’s Photo Archives, the Navy Art Collection and the National Archives. On April 1, 1945, under heavy naval gunfire and aircraft support, U.S…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 26

March 27, 1953: Korean War Sailor Earns Medal of Honor

Thursday, March 26, 2015 3:57 PM

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  By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric Lockwood, Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division Residents of Alexandria, Va. can honor an American hero with a tip of their hats to Francis C. Hammond Middle School on Seminary Road this Friday. It was 62 years ago on Friday when that school’s namesake, a young Alexandria man, performed “great personal valor in the face of overwhelming odds” while taking care of wounded members of the 1st Marine Division in South Korea. Hammond was born Nov. 9, 1931 to Harry and Elvira Hammond, in Alexandria, Va. Harry worked at a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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