Author Archive

Mar 23

Driving Navy Innovation: Turboelectric to Hybrid Propulsion

Monday, March 23, 2015 4:39 PM

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By Rear Adm. Kevin Slates Director, Energy and Environmental Readiness Division Ninety-eight years ago today, the Navy deployed a new technology on USS New Mexico (BB 40) that was then hailed as one of the most important achievements of the scientific age: the turboelectric drive. Before this major event, ships used a direct-drive steam turbine, which started with the HMS Dreadnought. Direct drive turbines were very efficient at faster speeds, but at slow speeds they wasted energy when the propeller turned too quickly, causing cavitation. Since the average underway speed of battleships was under 15 knots, this proved to be an… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 21

Celebrating the First Women to Join the Naval Reserve Force

Saturday, March 21, 2015 8:00 AM

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By Holly Quick, public affairs specialist, Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division Every March during Women’s History Month we commemorate the diverse contributions women have made, and continue to make, to our nation and our military. This March also marks the Centennial of the Navy Reserve and it would be remiss not to celebrate the contributions of Chief Yeoman (F) Loretta P. Walsh, the first woman enrolled in the Naval Reserve Force, and the women who joined her in support of the First World War. In March 1917, as the United States was reaching the final decision… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 19

‘Sea Wolf’ Bulkeley’s European Theater Exploits Heroic

Thursday, March 19, 2015 7:40 AM

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From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division If you were intrigued last week by Lt. John D. “Sea Wolf” Bulkeley’s daring journey to drive his PT boat 600 miles in unchartered waters, through minefields and dodging Japanese patrol boats to get General Douglas MacArthur to safety, then you’re in luck today; there is more to his story. The commander of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Three was no one-hit wonder when it came to World War II heroics. Bulkeley’s exploits didn’t end in the Pacific Theater. By June 6, 1944, Lt. Cmdr. Bulkeley was commanding officer of the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 13

Military Sealift Command and Innovation: New Platforms and Avenues for Meeting Navy’s Needs

Friday, March 13, 2015 3:00 PM

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By Rear Adm. Kevin C. Hayes, Deputy Commander, Military Sealift Command   This day in 1964, our Navy commissioned USS Sacramento (AOE 1) at Seattle, Washington. She was the first ship that combined the characteristics of an oiler, ammunition and supply ship. Anyone familiar with the current class of fast combat support ships can see the enduring value of fast, one-stop shopping for our combatant vessels at sea. Today’s Navy still puts a premium on the innovative design and use of new ship platforms, but it’s no secret that we operate in a tough fiscal environment. Budget realities mean leaders must… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 11

‘Sea Wolf’ Bulkeley’s Daring Journey Earns Medal of Honor

Wednesday, March 11, 2015 3:40 PM

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From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division Seventy-three years ago, Lt. John D. Bulkeley, the commander of Patrol Torpedo Boat No. 41, waited at the north pier off the island of Corregidor for the words that would begin a harrowing 2-day journey through minefields, unchartered waters and a Japanese fleet on the prowl. “You may cast off, Buck, when you are ready.” With those words spoken by American General of the Army Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Bulkeley, commanding officer of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Three, pulled away at 7:45 p.m. March 11, 1942, into what was becoming increasingly… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 10

On the Eve of Peace, the War Still Rages

Tuesday, March 10, 2015 6:47 PM

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By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric Lockwood, Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division After a long struggle for independence, the United States of America succeeded in its break from Great Britain. Suffering several more defeats following the British surrender at Yorktown in October 1781, British Parliament agreed in April 1782 to cease offensive operations against their soon-to-be ex-colony and peace negotiations began. Both sides saw no point in fighting, and an armistice was struck but an official end to the war was still more than a year away. So for some, the Revolutionary War continued. Especially since at the time,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 7

NHHC Director Speaks at USS Houston (CA 30) Survivors Association Reunion

Saturday, March 7, 2015 1:55 PM

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  This weekend members of the USS Houston (CA 30) Survivors Association and Next Generations are gathered for their 2015 reunion in Houston, Texas. In addition to conducting the business of the organization the reunion featured a dinner last night in which Naval History and Heritage Command Director Rear Adm. (Ret) Sam Cox provided the keynote remarks updating reunion attendees on the NHHC study of the condition of Houston’s wreck as well as ongoing Navy and diplomatic efforts to prevent further unauthorized disturbance of the ship which is the final resting place of more than 700 Houston Sailors and Marines… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 6

The Legacy of Ships Named Enterprise

Friday, March 6, 2015 3:46 PM

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  by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric Lockwood, Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division On March 6, 1822, a 12-gun schooner named Enterprise captured four pirate vessels in the Gulf of Mexico. The event is little known, not well documented, and it was one of her last operations before sinking in the West Indies a year later. But her actions on this day stand alongside a proud history in the legacy of the Enterprise. There have been eight U.S. Navy ships named Enterprise, creating a legacy that will carry well into the future as PCU Enterprise… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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