Archive for the 'Artifacts' Category

Sep 26

Origins of Valor: The History of the Navy Medal of Honor

Thursday, September 26, 2019 11:47 AM

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By the end of the Civil War, the Union’s Armed Forces loss some 365,000 men, with more than double that in total casualties suffered during the four year-long “War Between the States”. With such widespread violence plaguing the divided country, acts of heroism and bravery on the part of fighting men were becoming more and more commonplace. However, this same violence caused concern in the ranks of the Navy very early on in the war. Would enough men be willing to enlist for service, put their lives on the line for their country? Various awards for distinguished service in the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 16

Scuttlebutt: Thanksgiving 1943

Friday, November 16, 2018 12:09 PM

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The Naval Institute Archive was recently the recipient of a lucky find by Bill Foley of Boston who came upon some USS Hermitage (AP-54) papers left behind in an attic of a house that a friend of his purchased. Among those papers was a stack of “Scuttlebutt” newspapers, which kept the crew up to date on news around the world and included lighter pieces that were presented in an entertaining way. “Scutttlebutt” was published daily, and I’m sure it was appreciated much as our modern day sailors enjoy digital content to connect them to the world beyond their ship at sea.

 
May 11

Rare German Helmet from Hindenburg Ground Crew

Friday, May 11, 2018 2:15 AM

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May 6 marked the 81st anniversary of the fiery destruction of the Hindenburg at NAS Lakehurst. The cause of the disaster is still debated but the prevailing theory is that the airship’s highly volatile hydrogen gas was ignited by static electricity as the Hindenburg descended. The widely circulated film of the burning zeppelin shocked the public. The incident caused Deutsche Zepplelin Reederei (German Zeppelin Transport Company) to ground its airships and suspend its burgeoning transatlantic operations. The outbreak of WWII a few years later prevented DZR from reestablishing it’s commercial passenger service and all its airships were ordered to be… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 10

The Corps’ Parris Island Museum

Thursday, November 10, 2016 1:31 PM

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Men who enlist in the Marine Corps east of the Mississippi River and all women joining the Corps must first report to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot at Parris Island, South Carolina, for four hellish months of physical training and conditioning. If they make it through, they emerge as Marines. An important teaching tool there is the Parris Island Museum, where raw recruits—and visiting civilians—can learn about the service’s heritage and the rich history of the island where Marines leave behind civilian life and become warriors. The museum is located in a circa-1951 building that once housed an enlisted recreation… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 7

Mine Over Matter

Thursday, April 7, 2016 12:01 AM

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On the evening of 14 April 1988, Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) was steaming though the Persian Gulf when her forward lookout spotted several ominous spherical canisters with floating on the surface: sea mines! Though the crew managed to stop the ship in time to avoid the ones they saw — it was one that was not spotted lurking just below the surface with which guided-missile frigate collided. 253 pounds of TNT detonated, blowing a huge hole in Roberts’ hull, flooding several compartments, and sending several sailors to the hospital. The mines were identified as being put down by the previous… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 14

A Story in a Spoon

Thursday, January 14, 2016 12:01 AM

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“Our country is at WAR,” read the memorandum to the employees of Buffalo, New York’s, Republic Metalware Company shortly after the United States declared war against Germany in April 1917. “Some of our boys are in the Army or the Navy; others will go when called for. The rest of us—women and older men—will fight the enemy in Buffalo. How shall we do this? “War is not only a series of battles between armies or fleets. It is a conflict in which the whole strength of a nation . . . fights the whole strength of another nation. Everyone helps… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 12

Monument of the Month: The Phantom (II) of the Naval Academy

Thursday, November 12, 2015 12:01 AM

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On 28 June 1967 Commander (later Vice Admiral) William P. “Bill” Lawrence was the flying the lead plane of the flight of 36 aircraft from VF-143 of the USS Constellation. Theirs was an attack mission on transshipment points in the city of Nam Dinh in North Vietnam. His F-4B Phantom II was part of group of 8 F-4s flying as flak suppressors for the other aircraft. As he he streaked in at over 500 knots, Lawrence remembered thinking “Boy, I won’t have to sweat the missiles today, because we’ll be outside the missile zone.” As he was rolling on target,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Sep 18

Monument of the Month: Granite, Old and New

Friday, September 18, 2015 6:00 AM

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Seal-Greenbuy.

The old NSS Annapolis, otherwise known as the Naval Communications Station Washington, D.C. Transmitter, at Greenbury Point on the Severn River to the West of Annapolis, is not a place where one might expect to begin a discussion on monuments. But sometimes the most curious and intriguing of things are found in overlooked and unexpected places. The three red-and-white radio towers on the wooded peninsula, once used to communicate with submerged submarines are the most prominent reminders of what was once a bustling and active radio transmitting facility. Though it is still a gunnery range and part of the NSA… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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