Archive for the 'Commemorations' Category

Feb 1

“Sixteen Minutes from Home” Willie McCool’s Memorial

Saturday, February 1, 2020 12:01 AM

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Commander William C. McCool, USN, gave his life on 1 February 2003 while piloting Space Shuttle Columbia mission STS-107. Foam from the external fuel tank broke off and struck the shuttle’s left-wing during take-off. The seemingly minor damage led to the shuttle’s disintegration during reentry more than two weeks later. McCool has several schools, tracks, parks, and buildings named in his honor. There are even memorials to him spread across the solar system. There is Asteroid 51829 Williemccool and McCool hill on Mars. One of the most personal memorials, however, resides on the U.S. Naval Academy Cross Country Course in… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 24

Historic Site: Harbor View Memorial Park

Friday, August 24, 2018 2:46 PM

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While we recall the wreck of the USS Memphis (ACR-10) which occurred on August 29, 1916 killing 43 crew members, let’s remember a lesser known tragedy that occurred aboard the ship when she was known by her original name, Tennessee.   Inscription: George Wood (-1908) Watertender U.S. A Reinhold (-1908) M.M. 2.C. S. W. Meek (-1908) F. 1.C. E. C. Boccs (-1908)F. 2.C. F. S. Maxfield (-1908)F. 2.C. J. P. A. Carroll (-1908)F. 2.C. E. J. Burns (-1908) C.P. Died Heroically at Their Stations, In Line of Duty, USS Tennessee (ACR-10), June, 1908, Erected by Shipmates

 
May 30

In Respect to Their Memory and Admiration of Their Valor

Monday, May 30, 2016 12:01 AM

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The ornate, allegorical Tripoli Monument is a memorial to six U.S. naval officers’ ultimate sacrifice during the Barbary War. On the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy, sandwiched between Leahy Hall and Preble Hall, lies an unlikely looking military memorial. Its elaborate, asymmetrical appearance, however, belies its rich martial past. In fact, the white marble statuary is the United States’ oldest military monument, built to commemorate the supreme sacrifice of U.S. naval officers during the Barbary War against Tripoli and originally funded by their fellow officers. The monument was the idea of David Porter, who would rise to become a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Dec 10

A Midget Submarine Emerges

Thursday, December 10, 2015 12:01 AM

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current hoist

Monday last marked the 74th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Much indeed has been written about the attack, which killed 2,403 US servicemen died, as did 64 of the Japanese attackers and 35 civilians. One particular area of interest has been the operations of the Japanese midget submarines during the attacks. For several decades after the attack, many mysteries surrounded the efficacy and fate of the two-man submersibles. With 9/10 of their crews having perished in the attack, one man (and his vessel) being captured, very little could be found to piece together just what had happened… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jun 5

D-Day invasion of Normandy Q & A

Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:34 PM

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Capt. Henry Hendrix, (Ph.D) Naval History and Heritage Command director and Robert Cressman, NHHC historian answer questions about the D-Day invasion of Normandy, codenamed Operation Neptune in this four part series.   Question 1: How important was the element of surprise during D-Day operations? Question 2: How does D-Day compare to how we conduct joint partnership/ combined operations today? Question 3: In terms of logistics what did it take to pull off the D-Day invasion? Question 4: How important was naval gunfire support during D-Day – the invasion of Normandy? Question 5: What could the Navy have done differently during… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 13

Navy Nurses #OperatingForward 106 Years Later

Tuesday, May 13, 2014 6:00 AM

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  By André B. Sobocinski, Navy Medicine Office of the Historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery May 13th marks the 106th anniversary of the Navy Nurse Corps. On May 13, 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Naval Appropriations Bill authorizing the establishment of the Nurse Corps as a unique staff corps in the Navy. Initially, all Nurse Corps candidates were required to travel to Washington, D.C., at their own expense and take an oral and written examination. Since many applicants expressed reluctance to travel at their own expense, U.S. Navy Surgeon General Presley Rixey ordered that applicants be… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Dec 20

First female Navy captain oversaw greatest growth of Nurse Corps

Friday, December 20, 2013 1:22 PM

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    By André Sobocinski, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery historian This Day in History, Dec. 22, 1942: The First Female Captain in the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps Superintendent Sue Dauser (1888-1972) was promoted to the “relative rank” of captain, becoming the first woman in United States Navy history to achieve this status, Dec. 22, 1942.[1] Just two years later, when Public Law No. 238 granted full military “wartime” rank to Navy nurses, Dauser became the first woman commissioned as a captain in the U.S. Navy.  Throughout her long and accomplished career (1917-1946), Dauser served across the globe, both… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 23

NHHC Logo Contest Still Cruising!

Friday, August 23, 2013 2:04 PM

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The entries have been sailing in and we thank everyone for sharing their ideas and creativity! The contest is nearing its end, but there is still time to submit your entries! Entries will be accepted through Midnight on September 1st! Here are a few more shining examples of the entries we’ve received! This submission from MC1 Gina Morrissette uses simplicity and tradition to represent everyone who serves in the Navy (past/present/future).    Our latest entry comes from Joe Ieraci, incorporates surface, air, and sub forces.    Be sure to submit your entries before this cruise is over! For complete rules… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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