Archive for the 'Commemorations' Category

Oct 27

The First Navy Day: October 27, 1922

Saturday, October 27, 2012 1:00 AM

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DURING the World War there was a club for the enlisted men of the Navy and Marine Corps located at 509 Fifth Avenue, New York City, known then as the Navy Club. The club was operated by a group of ladies under the leadership of Mrs. William H. Hamilton. Countless tales could be told of the club of the war period, but this article does not concern those years which were heroic and memorable to all who visited there. Some time after the Armistice it was decided that the club should be continued as a permanent institution. The rented quarters… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 12

Champion of the Navy – Remarks to the Naval Institute by author David McCullough regarding John Adams' role in the birth of the U.S. Navy

Friday, October 12, 2012 12:00 PM

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“We live, my dear soul, in an age of trial. What will be the consequence, I know not.”-John Adams, 1774. The hardest thing in the world, and maybe the most important thing of all in writing and teaching history, is to convey the fun­damental truth that nothing ever had to happen the way it happened. The tendency when one teaches and writes history is that this followed this, and that followed that; therefore that’s the way it was preordained. But it never, ever was. The Founding Fathers did not know what was going to happen next, what the outcome of… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 9

140th Birthday of the U. S. Naval Institute

Tuesday, October 9, 2012 1:00 AM

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October 9th, 1873 First meeting of the U. S. Naval Institute   The U.S. Naval Institute was born on 9 October 1873, when fifteen officers met at the U.S. Naval Academy’s Department of Physics and Chemistry “…to organize a Society of Officers of the Navy for the purpose of discussing matters of professional interest” with Rear Admiral John L. Worden presiding. The meeting was likely the brainchild of Commodore Foxhall Parker & organized by Lieutenant Charles Belknap. The meeting was held in the department’s lecture room which was on the second floor, front of the building shown in the center… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 15

The Titanic Disaster

Sunday, April 15, 2012 7:26 PM

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April 15th, 1912 The sinking of the S. S. Titanic April 15th, 2012, marks the one-hundred year anniversary of the sinking of the “unsinkable” S. S. Titanic after a collision with an iceberg. The tragedy of the Titanic was not that such a large and well-built ship sank on her first and only voyage, but that she lacked sufficient life-saving equipment, which resulted in the unnecessary loss of many lives. In observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the Titanic disaster, the April 1962 issue of Proceedings contained an article, written by John Carroll Carrothers, which detailed the Titanic‘s brief history, from the beginning… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 4

The Establishment of NATO

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 1:00 AM

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April 4th, 1949 NATO is established   In the wake of World War II, and at the beginnings of the Cold War, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization was founded between the United States, Canada, and a large number of European nations. Ten years after the establishment of NATO, Proceedings published an article by Admiral W. F. Boone, USN, in its April 1959 issue. The article focused on the objectives of NATO as well as the acheivements and challenges encountered during the first ten years of its existence. Though establishing such an international union, especially in a time of peace, proved… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Sep 25

Silver Anniversary of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Commissioning

Sunday, September 25, 2011 1:00 AM

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September 25th, 1961 Commissioning of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Fifty years ago USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the world’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, was commissioned.  The biggest ship in the world at the time, Enterprise was certainly unique. However, as an article in the May 1961 issue of Proceedings noted, the name of such a unique ship was hardly new. Instead, Enterprise inherited in its name a rich Naval history with origins in the Revolutionary War and notable achievements in various Naval battles. The article, compiled from Navy Department releases, relates the unique & varied history of a name shared by eight different ships: The first Enterprise was… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 19

On the Hunt for Bonhomme Richard!

Tuesday, July 19, 2011 3:39 PM

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On July 17th, the NHHC Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) along with partners from Ocean Technology Foundation, Naval Oceanographic Office, SUPSALV, Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MSDU) 2 and the US Naval Academy, set out to continue the search for one of the Navy’s first fighting vessels, Bonhomme Richard. Captained by the father of our Navy, John Paul Jones, the ship was lost in 1779 after engaging in combat with HMS Serapis off the Yorkshire coast of England. Although Jones emerged victorious, Bonhomme Richard was irreparably damaged. After transferring all men and supplies safely to the captured Serapis, Jones set the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 4

John Paul Jones Hoists First Stars and Stripes Flag 4 July 1777

Monday, July 4, 2011 12:01 AM

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Standing at attention during the playing of The Star Spangled Banner, saluting the national ensign, and reciting the “Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag” are all acts performed occasionally by most Americans and regularly by the men and women who wear the uniforms of the armed services. These acts have meaning because of the flag’s symbolic significance. The stars and stripes represent the nation’s independence, the sacrifices that established and have maintained our freedom, and our national values embodied in the Declaration of Independence. This is why the displaying of a large stars and stripes flag on a building opposite… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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