Archive for the 'Diversity' Category

Sep 20

Hispanic Heritage Month: Admiral David Glasgow Farragut

Friday, September 20, 2019 9:18 AM

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  One of our foremost Hispanic Naval figures is Admiral David Glasgow Farragut, who’s brilliant career is well-known. What may not be so well known is his interesting early life.David Glasgow Farragut was born July 5, 1801 Campbells Station, Tennessee. His father was Jordi Farragut Mesquida who anglicized his Catalan name to George Farragut when he came to America and joined the South Carolina Navy. George Farragut was of unmixed Spanish decent born in Minorca where his family had been prominent for centuries. He married the former Elizabeth Shine of Dobbs County, North Carolina and the family moved to New… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Sep 10

The Angelic Nurses of World War II

Tuesday, September 10, 2019 12:01 AM

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The only thing worse for military members than repeating history is not knowing their heritage. Military members should learn about the women who served during World War II to ensure the long, lasting legacy of their sacrifice. This essay will examine the background of Navy and Army WWII nurse Prisoners of War (POWs), discuss their impact, and inspiration to future generations. Background In March 1941, none of the American nurses stationed in the Philippines during WWII expected to ever experience what lay before them. By December 24th, they were on the run from the Japanese, no longer in hospital buildings… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 28

March is here: Celebrate Women’s History

Thursday, February 28, 2019 2:58 PM

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It’s March: Women’s History Month, and a time to contemplate & celebrate the advances that women have made in our profession and in all professions. With that in mind, I’ve selected some special readings from the Naval Institute’s archive which I hope will inspire you to learn about women’s history, to embrace your leadership roles confidently & to mentor women who are starting out in their careers. Sarah Edmonds leaves the hospital tents for the battlefield, in a Civil War–era engraving. Before serving as a nurse, she had disguised herself as a man and enlisted in a Union infantry regiment,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 26

A Short History on Segregation in the Navy: From the War of 1812 through World War II

Tuesday, February 26, 2019 12:01 AM

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Alright, everyone, today I’m going to take you on a shallow dive into a topic that’s tough for a lot of people to talk about for a lot of different reasons: racial segregation. Specifically, the history of racial segregation in the Navy through World War II. It’s never fun, but it is a very important part of our history, and something that we need to examine no matter how uncomfortable it can make us feel. The history of Black sailors in the Navy begins with the War of 1812, as the U.S. Navy was not established until after the American… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 12

A Step Forward

Tuesday, February 12, 2019 12:01 AM

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On 15 March 1947, one month to the day before Jackie Robinson became the first black player in baseball’s major leagues, John Wesley Lee Jr. became the first African American to be commissioned as a regular officer in the Navy, that is, no longer a reservist. Many citizens of this country made it clear that they did not welcome Robinson’s arrival in baseball. He received numerous death threats and other pieces of hate mail. John Lee achieved his milestone without encountering hostility, and that was at least in part the result of how the Navy arranged things for him. After… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 8

World War One – USS Olympia’s Sailors

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 12:01 AM

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On 6 April 1917, the USS Olympia (C-6) was in transit, sailing from St. Thomas, Virgin Islands to Hampton Roads, Virginia. A gale was blowing from the southwest and the ship had to be secured for heavy weather. It was also the day Congress declared war against Germany. For the next nineteen months, USS Olympia sailors assisted with U.S. war efforts by participating in convoy patrols in the North Atlantic. The day that the Armistice was signed the ship was in Murmansk, Russia and a portion of her crew had spent the previous few months on land fighting the Bolsheviks.1… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Dec 16

Operation Desert Fox – 20 years ago – A “First” for Women

Sunday, December 16, 2018 8:00 AM

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Twenty years have passed since Operation Desert Fox, also known as the bombing of Iraq which took place December 16th – December 19th, 1998. The purpose of the attack was to degrade the ability of Iraq to use weapons of mass destruction. The main targets of the bombing included research and development installations, air defense systems, weapons and supply depots & the headquarters of Sadaam’s elite Republican Guard. The bombing was accomplished primarily by American and British jets and cruise missiles launched from the sea. Most of the targets were degraded or destroyed by the fourth night and the mission was declared a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Sep 27

The Programming Pirate: The Inspiring Life of “Amazing” Grace Hopper

Thursday, September 27, 2018 12:01 AM

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  On 7 December 1941, Grace and her husband Vincent listened to the radio at their home as news of a surprise aerial attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese was reported. The next day, the United States joined Britain and declared war on the Japanese Empire. The Pearl Harbor attack “would also be the chronological fulcrum from which Grace Hopper’s own life would pivot. In the months that followed that fateful day, Grace Murray Hopper would leave her position as a tenured professor at Vassar College, divorce her husband, and join the U.S. Navy at the age of 36… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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