Archive for the 'Heritage' Category

Jul 27

This Day in History – July 27th, 1953

Friday, July 27, 2018 10:35 AM

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Korean War Armistice with North Korean, Chinese, and American leaders.

The Armistice between the United States, South Korea, and North Korea that ended the Korean War was signed on July 27th, 1953. The Armistice marked the end of three years of bloodshed, setting terms and conditions that were meant to be temporary. It was to be followed by legislators and diplomats to settle the question of Korean statehood. Military leaders from each of the combatant countries oversaw the talks. Field Marshall Peng Dehuai was the representative from the People’s Republic of China, Lieutenant General William Kelly Harrison was the United States’, and General Nam Il was the People’s Democratic Republic… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 26

The National Security Act and Inter-Service Rivalry

Thursday, July 26, 2018 3:09 PM

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President Harry Truman signing the National Act into law on July 26, 1946.  The act would not go into effect until September 18 of that year. (Photo: Department of State)

On this day in 1947 President Harry Truman signed into law the National Security Act of 1947. The bill reorganized the military, by placing the Army and Navy into the Department of Defense, and creating the position of Secretary of Defense at its head. It also created the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Council. However, it seems the most impactful act from the bill, was establishment of a new branch of the military; the United States Air Force. Upon its inception, the Air Force began a campaign designed to downplay the significance of the Navy, especially aircraft carriers,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 26

Story Time with ’72: Meal Time Shenanigans

Thursday, July 26, 2018 12:01 AM

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  During Plebe Summer the mantra “just make it to the next meal” is not uncommon as meals provide a small break from the physical nature of the summer. Today during the academic year rivalry weeks when the Midshipmen are slated to play Air Force or Army King Hall becomes a place of danger for upper class who are tough on plebes. Food and water goes flying through the air to ruin the uniforms of the upperclassman and many others end up getting caught in the crossfire. The members of the Class of ’72 recall similar things happening during their… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 24

Day 2- March 17, 2018- Honolulu

Tuesday, July 24, 2018 12:01 AM

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Lieutenant Leroy Fadem recently revisited sites in the Pacific where he saw action in the Navy during the tumultuous years of the War in the Pacific over 70 years ago. This is a journal of that recent trip as kept by his son, Steven Fadem, who accompanied Lt. Fadem on that journey of rediscovery. The darkness out our window slowly fades to gray as the first rays of sunrise illuminate the palm trees silhouetted against a still ocean. This is a very different Honolulu than existed on the morning of December 7, 1941. It was a quiet Sunday morning in a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 20

The USS Essex From Mutiny to F-35s

Friday, July 20, 2018 12:01 AM

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Artist's rendition of the Battle of Valparaiso, depicting naval warfare between the frigate USS Essex, the HMS Phoebe, and the HMS Cherub. The battle raged for two and a half hours, ending with the surrender of the USS Essex. (Photo: USNI Archive)

As reported by USNI News, the USS Essex quietly deployed last Tuesday, 10 July. [Essex Amphibious Ready Group Quietly Deployed on Tuesday with Marine F-35s] The lack of “fanfare” was for “reasons of operational security”, according to USNI sources. The USS Essex is carrying the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit and their F-35s. However, this isn’t the first time a US Navy ship named USS Essex made headlines. There were five ships named USS Essex in U.S. Navy history, starting with the 32-gun sailing frigate commissioned in 1799. On 9 December 1813, the sailors of USS Essex staged a mutiny. Luckily, CAPT Porter… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 19

Story Time with ’72: USNA Class of 1972 Remembers I-Day from 50 Years Ago

Thursday, July 19, 2018 12:01 AM

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Tried and True with 72. (Photo courtesy of Britt Watwood)

Thursday June 28th the U.S. Naval Academy inducted the newest class of midshipmen. On I-Day, just as it is every year, the yard was busy with parents trying to catch a glimpse of their child as they exited Alumni Hall’s loading docks where newly minted 2nd Lieutenant taught them how to salute and walked to their new home in Bancroft Hall. Just across the footbridge over College Creek vendors held an event to distract parents from the day’s events as well as welcome them to the USNA family.   Walking around the Parents tent, taking in the sight of excited and nervous parents,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 17

Earn Your Ink: Celebrate National Tattoo Day!

Tuesday, July 17, 2018 12:01 AM

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Getting “inked” is a tradition which spans back to the age of sail before the U.S. established its own navy. Many of the same tattoos from centuries ago are still found on sailors today. Sailors wear tattoos that depict their naval service. 1. Swallow Legend has it tattoos began when seven sailors from the ship “The Swallow” tattooed a swallow on their chests to mark their mutiny [1]. However, it is generally used measure how far a sailor travels. Originally a swallow was earned every 5,000 nautical miles. Due to the enhanced capabilities of today’s ships a sailor earns a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 15

Sailors Scream For Ice Cream!

Sunday, July 15, 2018 12:05 PM

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Sailors get ready to enjoy some ice cream and cake. (U.S. Naval Institute)

Few things are as important as coffee, tobacco, and ice cream in today’s Navy. Though coffee offers caffeine to get through long days and the tobacco provides opportunity for smoke breaks, ice cream acts on a separate level of physiological necessity. There are physiological studies that demonstrate ice cream is a “comfort” food that ranks above all others [1]. Aside from being the only food to lower the human startle response, the frozen treat is thought to invoke nostalgia that reminds individuals, especially those on long demanding deployments, of childhood innocence and security, and of family vacations that may be relaxing [1]…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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