Archive for the 'Heritage' Category

Jul 24

Day 2- March 17, 2018- Honolulu

Tuesday, July 24, 2018 12:01 AM

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Lieutenant Leroy Fadem recently revisited sites in the Pacific where he saw action in the Navy during the tumultuous years of the War in the Pacific over 70 years ago. This is a journal of that recent trip as kept by his son, Steven Fadem, who accompanied Lt. Fadem on that journey of rediscovery. The darkness out our window slowly fades to gray as the first rays of sunrise illuminate the palm trees silhouetted against a still ocean. This is a very different Honolulu than existed on the morning of December 7, 1941. It was a quiet Sunday morning in a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 20

The USS Essex From Mutiny to F-35s

Friday, July 20, 2018 12:01 AM

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As reported by USNI News, the USS Essex quietly deployed last Tuesday, 10 July. [Essex Amphibious Ready Group Quietly Deployed on Tuesday with Marine F-35s] The lack of “fanfare” was for “reasons of operational security”, according to USNI sources. The USS Essex is carrying the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit and their F-35s. However, this isn’t the first time a US Navy ship named USS Essex made headlines. There were five ships named USS Essex in U.S. Navy history, starting with the 32-gun sailing frigate commissioned in 1799. On 9 December 1813, the sailors of USS Essex staged a mutiny. Luckily, CAPT Porter… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 19

Story Time with ’72: USNA Class of 1972 Remembers I-Day from 50 Years Ago

Thursday, July 19, 2018 12:01 AM

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Thursday June 28th the U.S. Naval Academy inducted the newest class of midshipmen. On I-Day, just as it is every year, the yard was busy with parents trying to catch a glimpse of their child as they exited Alumni Hall’s loading docks where newly minted 2nd Lieutenant taught them how to salute and walked to their new home in Bancroft Hall. Just across the footbridge over College Creek vendors held an event to distract parents from the day’s events as well as welcome them to the USNA family.   Walking around the Parents tent, taking in the sight of excited and nervous parents,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 17

Earn Your Ink: Celebrate National Tattoo Day!

Tuesday, July 17, 2018 12:01 AM

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Getting “inked” is a tradition which spans back to the age of sail before the U.S. established its own navy. Many of the same tattoos from centuries ago are still found on sailors today. Sailors wear tattoos that depict their naval service. 1. Swallow Legend has it tattoos began when seven sailors from the ship “The Swallow” tattooed a swallow on their chests to mark their mutiny [1]. However, it is generally used measure how far a sailor travels. Originally a swallow was earned every 5,000 nautical miles. Due to the enhanced capabilities of today’s ships a sailor earns a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 15

Sailors Scream For Ice Cream!

Sunday, July 15, 2018 12:05 PM

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Few things are as important as coffee, tobacco, and ice cream in today’s Navy. Though coffee offers caffeine to get through long days and the tobacco provides opportunity for smoke breaks, ice cream acts on a separate level of physiological necessity. There are physiological studies that demonstrate ice cream is a “comfort” food that ranks above all others [1]. Aside from being the only food to lower the human startle response, the frozen treat is thought to invoke nostalgia that reminds individuals, especially those on long demanding deployments, of childhood innocence and security, and of family vacations that may be relaxing [1]…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 13

Drink to the Foam: The Navy’s Extensive History with Alcohol

Friday, July 13, 2018 12:01 AM

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If you decided to sign up as a seaman in the U.S. Navy 156 ago today, you would have found a “gill of spirits”– about a quarter pint of hard liquor– included in your daily food ration. The day after swearing in, however, you may have wound up disappointed: on 14 July 1862, Congress passed a law which banned spirit rations and required sailors to purchase their own liquor. Sailors were compensated with a 5-cent increase in daily pay. Congress’ abolition of the spirit rations marks an early episode in the tumultuous, centuries-long relationship between alcohol and the U.S. Sea… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 13

USCG Helos to the Rescue (Part 3)

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 10:13 AM

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On 15 February1943, Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Ernest J. King assigned responsibility for sea-going development of helicopters to the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard has proven time and time again that the helicopter is a unique instrument for the saving of human lives.” Here are some of the important missions flown by the service’s helicopters. ‘Yes, I Can’ The first life-saving mission by a Coast Guard rescue swimmer took place on 10 December 1987. At 1936 the Bluebird, a 26-foot fishing vessel requested assistance. The duty helicopter crew at Coast Guard Air Station Sitka, Alaska, quickly boarded HH–3F… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Dec 6

The Christmas Ship

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 12:38 PM

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The Christmas Ship By Admiral Hugh Rodman, U.S. Navy (Retired) The following item is from the New York Times of December 23, 1930 and was re-published in Proceedings magazine in 1931. Washington, December 22 (AP)—Hundreds of happy children shouting from the decks of Uncle Sam’s warships will greet their seagoing Santa Claus as he climbs aboard with his bag on Christ­mas morning. About 63,000 officers and men will spend Christ­mas this year aboard naval vessels. Far from home and their own children, the personnel of battleships and aircraft carriers have softened the homesick feeling by giving Christmas parties to the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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