Archive for the 'Heritage' Category

Jul 24

Day 2- March 17, 2018- Honolulu

Tuesday, July 24, 2018 12:01 AM

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Lieutenant Leroy Fadem recently revisited sites in the Pacific where he saw action in the Navy during the tumultuous years of the War in the Pacific over 70 years ago. This is a journal of that recent trip as kept by his son, Steven Fadem, who accompanied Lt. Fadem on that journey of rediscovery. The darkness out our window slowly fades to gray as the first rays of sunrise illuminate the palm trees silhouetted against a still ocean. This is a very different Honolulu than existed on the morning of December 7, 1941. It was a quiet Sunday morning in a… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 19

Story Time with '72: USNA Class of 1972 Remembers I-Day from 50 Years Ago

Thursday, July 19, 2018 12:01 AM

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Thursday June 28th the U.S. Naval Academy inducted the newest class of midshipmen. On I-Day, just as it is every year, the yard was busy with parents trying to catch a glimpse of their child as they exited Alumni Hall’s loading docks where newly minted 2nd Lieutenant taught them how to salute and walked to their new home in Bancroft Hall. Just across the footbridge over College Creek vendors held an event to distract parents from the day’s events as well as welcome them to the USNA family.   Walking around the Parents tent, taking in the sight of excited and nervous parents,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 15

Sailors Scream For Ice Cream!

Sunday, July 15, 2018 12:05 PM

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Few things are as important as coffee, tobacco, and ice cream in today’s Navy. Though coffee offers caffeine to get through long days and the tobacco provides opportunity for smoke breaks, ice cream acts on a separate level of physiological necessity. Studies demonstrate that ice cream is a “comfort” food that ranks above all others. Aside from being the only food to lower the human startle response, the frozen treat is thought to invoke nostalgia that reminds individuals–especially those on long demanding, deployments–of childhood innocence, of security, and of family vacations–memories that can be relaxing. In 1914, with new the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 13

Drink to the Foam: The Navy's Extensive History with Alcohol

Friday, July 13, 2018 12:01 AM

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If you decided to sign up as a seaman in the U.S. Navy 156 ago today, you would have found a “gill of spirits”– about a quarter pint of hard liquor– included in your daily food ration. The day after swearing in, however, you may have wound up disappointed: on 14 July 1862, Congress passed a law which banned spirit rations and required sailors to purchase their own liquor. Sailors were compensated with a 5-cent increase in daily pay. Congress’ abolition of the spirit rations marks an early episode in the tumultuous, centuries-long relationship between alcohol and the U.S. Sea… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Dec 6

The Christmas Ship

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 12:38 PM

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The Christmas Ship By Admiral Hugh Rodman, U.S. Navy (Retired) The following item is from the New York Times of December 23, 1930 and was re-published in Proceedings magazine in 1931. Washington, December 22 (AP)—Hundreds of happy children shouting from the decks of Uncle Sam’s warships will greet their seagoing Santa Claus as he climbs aboard with his bag on Christ­mas morning. About 63,000 officers and men will spend Christ­mas this year aboard naval vessels. Far from home and their own children, the personnel of battleships and aircraft carriers have softened the homesick feeling by giving Christmas parties to the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 19

Admiral Kimmel and the Attack

Friday, May 19, 2017 2:59 PM

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  Beginning in December 2016, I began writing a series of monthly (approximately) “H-Grams” that go to all active-duty and retired Navy flag officers, and the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, with the expectation that they would be disseminated further to fleet Sailors, and with the acceptance that they would make their way “into the wild.” I did this with the approval of the Chief of Naval Operations and Director, Navy Staff to support the Navy’s “Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority” which includes a sub-task to “Know Our History.” My intent is to write them in a way… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 15

'Missing and Presumed Lost'

Friday, July 15, 2016 12:54 PM

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  On a quiet scientific survey in the fall of 2014, one of the mysteries of the U.S. Navy was solved. The discovery of a deteriorating hulk of a ship in just 189 feet of water, 27 miles outside of San Francisco’s Golden Gate, resolved the question of what had happened and where lay the wreck of the USS Conestoga (AT-54), one of only 18 U.S. Navy ships that disappeared, never to be seen again in the years before World War II. On 25 March 1921, the Conestoga had departed Mare Island Navy Yard with orders to proceed to Pearl… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 6

A ‘Rough-House’

Wednesday, July 6, 2016 4:27 PM

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In the 1908 Lucky Bag, the college yearbook of U.S. Naval Academy graduates, one of the midshipmen was described by his classmates as “a black-eyed, rosy-cheeked, noisy Irishman who loves a rough-house.” This “noisy Irishman” was Thomas Cassin Kinkaid, who in coming to Annapolis was following in his father’s footsteps. His seagoing career began with Theodore Roosevelt’s “Great White Fleet” as it made the historic voyage around the world, showing the American flag and proclaiming U.S. naval power in the new century. As befitting a genuine “rough-houser,” Kinkaid spent most of his subsequent career in naval gunnery, with sea tours… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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