Archive for the 'Navy' Category

Aug 3

This Day in History: The Nautilus' Under Pole Passage

Saturday, August 3, 2019 12:01 AM

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As the first commanding officer of the nuclear-powered submarine Nautilus (SSN-571), Commander Eugene Wilkinson famously broadcast to the world on 17 January 1955, “Underway on Nuclear Power.” He knew firsthand just how capable the boat and her crew were. But by 1958, he had moved on to command Submarine Division 102. The man in charge was now Commander William Anderson. The skipper was slated to take the Nautilus up the West Coast, under the North Pole, and back down the East Coast. To prepare for this tall order, Anderson first drove the Nautilus, loaded with crew and scientists alike, under… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 17

Moser's Naval Photo Logs — 'Just the Thing'

Thursday, January 17, 2019 10:15 AM

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Battleship Vermont in a storm, by N. Moser

Norbert George Moser was born in Pierceton, Indiana, to the immigrant German merchant Gabriel Moser and Illinois native Anna Miller on 18 September 1885. Shortly after completing high school in 1904, Norbert enlisted in the U.S. Navy and became an electrician’s mate, working with new wireless radio technologies. He served on board the USS Virginia (Battleship No. 13) stationed out of Hampton Roads in 1910, and when he married Julia Hall in 1914, Moser was stationed at the Chelsea (Massachusetts) Naval Hospital. It appears that Moser had grander designs than working the wireless set. At the expiration of his enlistment, he was serving as a chief… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 15

USS Houston (CL-81) Plans 43rd Reunion

Tuesday, January 15, 2019 1:41 PM

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  The 43rd Annual Reunion of the USS Houston (CL-81) will be held September 11th – 15th, 2019, at the Hilton Garden Inn Louisville Airport at 2735 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, KY 40209. Activities will include a riverboat ride as well as a tour of Churchill Downs. Family members of shipmates are welcome to attend. Contact John Benge (organizer) by email at [email protected] or by phone at 606-877-5151.       микрозаймы Fast Cash Advance

 
Jun 12

The Sinking of the USS President Lincoln, 31 May 1918

Tuesday, June 12, 2018 12:01 AM

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Painting by Fred Dana Marsh, 1920, depicting the ship sinking after she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-90 on 31 May 1918

31 May 2018 marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the troop transport USS President Lincoln. Formerly a German ocean liner of the Hamburg-America Line, she was commissioned by the Navy in 1917 to ferry young men and equipment to the Western Front. In 1918, her luck ran out when she was torpedoed by the German submarine SM U-90.  In 1922, her commanding officer at the time of the sinking, Commander P. W. Foote, USN, wrote his remembrances of the fateful day for Proceedings. It is excerpted and illustrated here.

 
May 17

The Making of a Naval Disaster

Thursday, May 17, 2018 12:01 AM

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The Peloponnesian War of 431–404 BC. between the Spartan-led Peloponnesian alliance and the Delian League dominated by Athens was a seminal event in naval history. The nature of the conflict practically guaranteed that maritime control would be a critical factor, as neither of the two major power blocs had the means to launch a decisive assault on the other’s homeland and were forced into a long series of peripheral actions in an attempt to wear the other side out. The great Athenian statesman Pericles openly and explicitly built Athenian military strategy around protecting and using the Athenian navy to raid… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 3

Captain Howard J. Kerr Jr., USN (Retired) on Admiral Zumwalt's Z-grams

Wednesday, January 3, 2018 12:01 AM

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How does the crew of a U.S. Navy warship react to directives from the top—the very top, as in the Chief of Naval Operations? In a selection from Navy Captain Howard J. Kerr Jr.’s U.S. Naval Institute oral history, he speaks about the impact CNO Admiral Elmo Zumwalt’s “Z-grams” had among his crew. Policy directives, the Z-grams often dealt with Navy personnel issues in an effort to improve enlisted life and reduce racial tensions. Kerr was an aide to Admiral Zumwalt as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Vietnam, and commanding officer of the USS Hawkins (DD-873), a unit of the “Mod Squad”—a Zumwalt concept… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 15

The "Wide Wide World" of War

Wednesday, November 15, 2017 8:47 AM

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Viewers tuning in to NBC’s acclaimed 90-minute documentary series “Wide Wide World” on their luxurious 21-inch television screens on Sunday, 13 May 1956, were bound to be fascinated by that week’s program. The synopsis in the TV Guide promised audiences a first in the history of television — a live demonstrations of American firepower: The story of America’s “Power for Peace” will be told explosively by “Wide Wide World” with such items as the detonation of two simulated atomic bombs, the shooting down of a B-17 bomber and the firing of guided missiles. The atomic bomb simulations will be stage by the Army at Fort… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 7

A Case for Submarine Chasers

Monday, November 7, 2016 12:01 AM

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U.S. Navy SC-1–class submarine chasers performed significant services that became an integral part of the Allied effort to win World War I war at sea. They did this by their teamwork incessantly patrolling the eastern European and western United States littorals. At the end of the war, Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels reported that 355 wooden submarine chasers had been constructed to implement submarine defensives measures. The 110-foot ships had a crew of 2 officers and 20 men, one 3-inch gun mount, two .30-caliber machine guns, and one y-gun to project depth charges. With three 220-horsepower gasoline engines attached… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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