Archive for the 'People' Category

Aug 16

U.S. Marines in Nicaragua, 1927-1932

Thursday, August 16, 2018 12:01 AM

By

Marines on Patrol (USMC History Division)

The Second Nicaragua intervention of 1927-1932 marks a unique and very interesting chapter in Marine Corps history. Marines were dispatched to the Central American republic to support democracy by supervising a contentious presidential election and building an apolitical internal security force, the Guardia Nacional, that could take over from the Marines and police their own country. However, U.S. Marines soon found themselves deep in the jungles, manning lonely posts and on the trail chasing elusive rebels that refused to honor a political process they saw as being tampered with by meddlesome foreigners. Many innovations were developed and countless lessons were… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 7

Ticonderoga: The Almost-First Steam-Powered Warship

Tuesday, August 7, 2018 12:01 AM

By

Commodore Thomas Macdonough (Gilbert Stuart-National Gallery of Art)

Demologos, later renamed Fulton after its creator Robert Fulton, was the first steam-powered vessel in the U.S. Navy in 1815. The unique floating battery almost did not receive that distinction. Only a matter of months earlier, Master Commandant Thomas Macdonough almost brought a steam-powered warship to the most decisive battle of the War of 1812. The United States and Great Britain had been at war since June 1812, and Napoleon’s defeat in April 1814 brought thousands of experienced soldiers to Canada. The war of 1812 began as a sideshow to the British government, but now had their military’s undivided attention…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 3

This Day in History – August 3rd, 2018

Friday, August 3, 2018 12:01 AM

By

General Patton slaps soldier. Credit: Argunners

On this day in 1943, Lt. Gen. George S. Patton slapped a soldier hospitalized for psychoneurosis, accusing him of cowardice. The event almost ended Patton’s career.   General Patton, at the time was commander of the Seventh U.S. Army. He visited a military hospital in Sicily where he visited with wounded soldiers, asking them about their injuries. Patton then encountered a soldier who lacked visible signs of injury, he then inquired about the soldier’s health. The soldier was Private Charles Kuhl and only 18 years old. Patton questioned Kuhl why he was in the hospital and Kuhl replied, “Its my… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 4

Citizen Soldiers

Wednesday, July 4, 2018 12:01 AM

By

Uncle Sam

It’s time to celebrate civilians and the contributions they made to the American war effort! 1. Clarissa “Clara” Harlowe Barton (Civil War) “I may be compelled to face danger, but never fear it, and while our soldiers can stand and fight, I can stand and feed and nurse them.” Clara Barton risked her life during the Civil War to bring aid and supplies to wounded soldiers. Initially, she collected and distributed supplies for the Union Army, but then decided to take a more active role. She began in Fredericksburg, Virginia in 1862 serving as an independent nurse. She earned the name:… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 29

Pieces of the Past-Douglas Fairbanks Jr.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018 12:01 AM

By

Douglas Fairbanks Jr. in uniform

Naval History magazine recently showcased a fascinating relic of the U.S. Navy in World War II—a relic with a celebrity vibe: the custom-made oaken case housing an array of medals from ten nations, all awarded to the classic Hollywood legend Douglas Fairbanks Jr. for his wartime service. He was one of those rare few stars who was more of a hero in real life than on the silver screen. The case and medals, now in the collection of the U.S. Naval Institute, served as an interesting photographic subject—interesting in its many angles and in its diverse content. Alas, due to… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 22

Old but Still Going Strong: The Oldest Navy Assets Still in Use

Wednesday, November 22, 2017 4:53 PM

By

USS Constitution underway in 2012

The U.S. Navy has always been an innovator. It pioneered the Global Positioning System, developed nuclear propulsion, and deployed the first operational laser weapon. The recently commissioned USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is brimming with bleeding-edge technology. Its stealth design, Integrated Power System, and long-range gun firing capabilities make it the most sophisticated ship in the world. Likewise, the lead ship in the new carrier class USS Gerald R Ford (CVN-78) features many technological advances including an electromagnetic aircraft launch system. However, the Department of the Navy is not always in a rush to phase out and replace assets that continue to… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 19

Admiral Kimmel and the Attack

Friday, May 19, 2017 2:59 PM

By

Pacific Fleet Commander-in-Chief Admiral Husband Kimmel (U.S. Naval Institute Photo Archive)

  Beginning in December 2016, I began writing a series of monthly (approximately) “H-Grams” that go to all active-duty and retired Navy flag officers, and the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, with the expectation that they would be disseminated further to fleet Sailors, and with the acceptance that they would make their way “into the wild.” I did this with the approval of the Chief of Naval Operations and Director, Navy Staff to support the Navy’s “Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority” which includes a sub-task to “Know Our History.” My intent is to write them in a way… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 11

Out of the Jaws of Victory

Monday, April 11, 2016 12:01 AM

By

Highly decorated for his role in gaining victory over the Japanese at Midway, Captain Miles Browning was defeated by his most implacable enemy--himself. (National Archives)

Like a character in classical tragedy, blessed by the gods with nearly every advantage, Miles Browning also possessed fatal flaws that ultimately brought him down. Endowed with striking looks, high intelligence, slide-rule brain, useful marital connections, exceptional flying ability and the patronage of America’s favorite admiral, Browning seemed perfectly poised to achieve high command as aviation emerged at the cutting edge of naval warfare. And yet, not until his retirement was it deemed safe to raise Browning to flag rank. Historian Samuel E. Morison, who knew him, called Browning “one of the most irascible officers ever to earn a fourth… Read the rest of this entry »

 
« Older Entries