Archive for the 'Submarines' Category

Jan 11

H.L. Hunley Fully Visible for the First Time

Wednesday, January 11, 2012 11:06 AM

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On February 17, 1864, Confederate-built H.L. Hunley became the world’s first successful combat submarine when it attacked and sank the 1240-short ton screw sloop USS Housatonic at the entrance to the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. H.L. Hunley surfaced briefly to signal a successful mission to comrades on shore with a blue magnesium light, after which it was never seen again. All eight of its crewmen were presumed lost and despite multiple search efforts, the submarine could not be relocated.  Over 136 years later, on 8 August, 2000, H.L. Hunley was raised from the sea floor using a specially-designed support frame, or truss. A multi-disciplinary team,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Sep 16

First Submarine Launch of Regulus II, 16 September 1958

Friday, September 16, 2011 12:01 AM

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Commissioned on 7 March 1958, GRAYBACK (SSG 574) was the Navy’s first submarine to carry the Regulus II sea-to-surface missile. While operating out of Port Hueneme, Calif., on 16 September 1958 she carried out the first successful launch of a Regulus II from a submarine, which pointed the way to a revolutionary advance in the power of navies to attack land bases. GRAYBACK conducted her first deterrent missile strike mission from 21 September to 12 November 1959, patrolling secretly through Pacific waters with a full load of missiles ready for retaliation 1,000 miles inland in event of war. Following modifications… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 11

USS Skate (SSN-578) Becomes the First Submarine to Surface at the North Pole

Thursday, August 11, 2011 12:01 AM

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USS Skate (SSN-578) hung below the Arctic ice like a matchstick suspended an inch from the ceiling of a large room. A knot of sailors in the control room stared intently at an instrument inscribing patterns of parallel lines on a rolling paper tape. The pattern looked like an upside down mountain range. “Heavy ice, ten feet,” said one of the sailors. Suddenly the lines converged into a single narrow bar. “Clear water!” the sailor called out. Commander James Calvert, the skipper, studied the marks on the paper closely. He stopped the submarine, ordered “up periscope,” and peered into the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 10

USS Triton Circumnavigates the Globe

Tuesday, May 10, 2011 1:51 AM

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May, 10th 1960

 
Apr 11

Happy Birthday, U.S. Submarine Force

Monday, April 11, 2011 1:13 AM

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April, 11th 1900 The US Navy accepts the design of it’s first official submarine the USS Holland, named after the engineer and designer John Philip Holland. Below are a couple of short articles from Proceedings professional notes section at the time of the Navy’s acceptance of the Holland. From Proceedings 1898 #86 SUCCESSFUL TRIALS OF THE HOLLAND SUBMARINE BOAT. The naval board appointed to inspect and report on the performance of the Holland submarine boat has reported that in the recent tests, held on November 6, in New York harbor, she fulfilled all the requirements laid down by the department.

 
Feb 10

USS Sargo Surfaced at North Pole

Thursday, February 10, 2011 1:20 AM

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February 10th, 1960 the USS Sargo became one of the first Subs, the 3rd, to surface at the North Pole.

 
Dec 31

Project Azorian on NavyTV

Friday, December 31, 2010 3:12 PM

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Norman Polmar, Author of Project Azorian: The CIA and the Raising of the K-129, will discuss and sign his book followed by a Q&A at Navy Memorial on Tuesday, January 11th, beginning at 12PM. The event is free and open to the public. Click here for more information on the event and watch the trailer above to learn more about the untold story of Project Azorian.

 
Dec 11

Countdown for Polaris

Saturday, December 11, 2010 12:01 AM

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This Cold War documentary follows the development of the Polaris submarine launched ballistic missile and contains footage of numerous test launches of Polaris as well as the launching and commissioning of USS George Washington (SSBN-598).   Source: Naval History and Heritage Command, Photographic Section, UM-23.

 
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