Archive for the 'This Day in History' Category

Aug 23

Can You Hear Me Now?

Friday, August 23, 2019 12:01 AM

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Satellite based communication, from satellite phone service to G.P.S., has become essential to everyday life, however fifty years ago, it was almost impossible to imagine. That changed on 23 August 1963, when President John F. Kennedy made the first call relayed by satellite between two heads of state. President Kennedy called Nigerian Prime Minister Abubakar Tafawa Balewa on board the USNS Kingsport (T-AG-164), a converted Victory Class Military Sea Lift Command ship. Beginning in January of 1962 and completed in December, “The Kingsport was converted to a communication terminal by the Navy Bureau of Ships for use by the U.S…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 22

This Day in History: U.S. Navy Dental Corps Anniversary

Thursday, August 22, 2019 12:01 AM

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Today 107 years ago, the 62nd Congress passed an act, later signed by President Howard Taft, establishing the U.S. Navy Dental Corps. Since then, the Corps, whose mission is to prevent or remedy dental conditions that may interfere with the performance of duty by members of the active naval forces, has treated members of the active naval forces and their families worldwide.  In October 1912, the first two dental officers, Emory Bryant and William Cogan, entered active duty in the U.S. Navy. A year later, the Surgeon General of the United States reported to the Secretary of the Navy that… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 3

This Day in History: The Nautilus’ Under Pole Passage

Saturday, August 3, 2019 12:01 AM

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As the first commanding officer of the nuclear-powered submarine Nautilus (SSN-571), Commander Eugene Wilkinson famously broadcast to the world on 17 January 1955, “Underway on Nuclear Power.” He knew firsthand just how capable the boat and her crew were. But by 1958, he had moved on to command Submarine Division 102. The man in charge was now Commander William Anderson. The skipper was slated to take the Nautilus up the West Coast, under the North Pole, and back down the East Coast. To prepare for this tall order, Anderson first drove the Nautilus, loaded with crew and scientists alike, under… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jun 2

This Day in Naval History: June 2 – FIRST Aircraft Escort Carrier

Sunday, June 2, 2019 12:01 AM

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Aerial port broadside view of USS Long Island (CVE-1) underway.

On June 2, 1941, the USS Long Island (AVG-1) was commissioned as the first Auxiliary Aircraft Escort Carrier. The design led to more experimentation, turning merchant ships into aircraft carriers. By the end of World War II, there were more escort carriers than aircraft carriers. You are probably wondering what is an escort carrier? Don’t you mean an aircraft carrier? Wasn’t the first carrier called the Langley? Yes, the aircraft carrier came before the escort carrier. During World War II, there was a shortage of aircraft transport vessels. As a result, the escort carrier was created out of merchant ships… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 8

The Eagles Return

Wednesday, May 8, 2019 12:01 AM

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On 8 May 1919, the waterfront of Halifax harbor was lined with spectators awaiting the arrival of three U.S. Navy seaplanes from Long Island on the first leg of their much-heralded attempt to cross the Atlantic Ocean. Reports of their progress were received during the afternoon as they moved along the south shore of Nova Scotia and finally, at 7:40 pm, two of the aircraft, NC-3 and NC-1, landed safely in the harbor. These were Navy Curtiss or NC (Nancy) flying boats, designed as self-deploying anti-submarine aircraft and intended for combat duties. But when NC Seaplane Division One was commissioned… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 18

Reflections on Admiral Yamamoto

Thursday, April 18, 2019 12:01 AM

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On this date in 1943, U.S. Army Air Forces P-38 Lightning fighters, acting on U.S. Navy signals intelligence, shot down a bomber carrying Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, Commander-in-Chief of the Japanese Combined Fleet and architect of the Pearl Harbor attack. Yamamoto’s death was a devastating blow to Japan’s war effort. Commander Edwin T. Layton, intelligence officer on the staff of Admiral Chester Nimitz, U.S. Pacific Fleet Commander-in-Chief, played a key role in the events that led to Yamamoto’s death. Ironically, Layton had gotten to know the Japanese admiral while serving as assistant naval attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo from… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 8

This Day in History: The Trent Affair

Thursday, November 8, 2018 12:01 AM

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Trent affair engraving

November 8 marks the anniversary of the Trent Affair of 1861. During the opening months of the Civil War, the U.S. Navy stopped the British mail steamer RMS Trent and seized two Confederate diplomats bound for England in the hope of negotiating diplomatic recognition for the secessionist states. The Trent Affair itself threatened to achieve exactly that and brought the United States and Great Britain close to war. Author James D. Hill wrote extensively of the Trent Affair and one of its main players—Captain Chalres Wilkes, U.S. Navy—in the July 1931 issue of Proceedings. It is excerpted here.

 
Sep 14

On This Day-September 14th

Friday, September 14, 2018 7:54 AM

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On this day in 1899 during the Philippine Insurrection Campaign, the gunboat, USS Concord, and the monitor, USS Monterey, capture two insurgent schooners at Aparri, Philippine Islands. Learn more about the Philippine Insurrection and the U.S. Navy’s role from these articles featured in Proceedings. April 1904 https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/1904-10/operations-navy-and-marine-corps-philippine-archepelago-1898-1902 March 1938 https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/1938-03/philippine-insurrection  

 
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