Archive for the 'This Day in History' Category

Aug 14

Today in Naval History: The Capture of the U.S. Brig Argus by H.M Brig Pelican

Tuesday, August 14, 2018 10:15 AM

By

Kimball Argus Burning commerce

Two hundred and five years ago today, on 14 August 1813, the U.S. Brig Argus, under command of Captain William H. Allen, fought her final battle with the HMS Pelican off the coast of England during the War of 1812. During the early-morning battle, Allen’s right leg was shot off, but he remained on station until fainting from a loss of blood. As Pelican‘s men boarded, Argus struck her colors. Allen died four days later. Writing about the incident in the May 1939 issue of Proceedings, Prof. Wilbur E. Apgar gave a thorough summary of the events. His summary is excerpted here. The amazing lack of concern… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 7

Commencing the Attack on Guadalcanal

Tuesday, August 7, 2018 2:00 PM

By

Marine forces training for an amphibious landing prior to the beginning of the Guadalcanal campaign.  (Photo: USNI Archive)

On 7 August 1942 the Allied forces began their first major counter-offensive against the Japanese at Guadalcanal. Since Pearl Harbor the U.S. had spent most their time recovering from the attack and re-building the badly damaged Pacific fleet. One high-poin, however, were the highly successful attacks known as “Doolittle’s Raids.” This “lull” in activity ended with the invasion of Guadalcanal. Code-named “Operation Watchtower,” Marines conducted a surprise raid of their primary target, the airfield, and quickly established a presence that allowed troops to arrive on the island. The initial invasion was such a surprise that the first Marines encountered little resistance…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 6

Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Monday, August 6, 2018 2:50 PM

By

Mushroom Cloud after Atomic Bomb Dropped on Hiroshima, Japan of August 6, 1945

On this day 73 years ago, the world changed. Never before had a country used nuclear weapons. The decision was not an easy, but it ultimately would save American lives. In a post from 2010, a silent film was uploaded to the USNI YouTube channel about the atomic bombs. Part 1 of the film includes the loading of “Little Boy” onto the B-29 Superfortress Enola Gay and the early morning activities on Tinian prior to takeoff. Part 2 contains footage of the Enola Gay landing after completing its mission over Hiroshima. It then shows the pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets, receiving the Distinguished… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 3

This Day in History – August 3rd, 2018

Friday, August 3, 2018 12:01 AM

By

General Patton slaps soldier. Credit: Argunners

On this day in 1943, Lt. Gen. George S. Patton slapped a soldier hospitalized for psychoneurosis, accusing him of cowardice. The event almost ended Patton’s career.   General Patton, at the time was commander of the Seventh U.S. Army. He visited a military hospital in Sicily where he visited with wounded soldiers, asking them about their injuries. Patton then encountered a soldier who lacked visible signs of injury, he then inquired about the soldier’s health. The soldier was Private Charles Kuhl and only 18 years old. Patton questioned Kuhl why he was in the hospital and Kuhl replied, “Its my… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 27

This Day in History – July 27th, 1953

Friday, July 27, 2018 10:35 AM

By

Korean War Armistice with North Korean, Chinese, and American leaders.

The Armistice between the United States, South Korea, and North Korea that ended the Korean War was signed on July 27th, 1953. The Armistice marked the end of three years of bloodshed, setting terms and conditions that were meant to be temporary. It was to be followed by legislators and diplomats to settle the question of Korean statehood. Military leaders from each of the combatant countries oversaw the talks. Field Marshall Peng Dehuai was the representative from the People’s Republic of China, Lieutenant General William Kelly Harrison was the United States’, and General Nam Il was the People’s Democratic Republic… Read the rest of this entry »