Archive for the 'Marine Corps' Category

May 16

When Dissent was a Common Virtue

Thursday, May 16, 2019 12:01 AM

By

Admiral Chester Nimitz summed up the Battle of Iwo Jima saying “Uncommon valor was a common virtue.” Nimitz’s words are inscribed on the Marine Memorial in Arlington, Virginia. The photo of six Marines raising the U.S. flag on Mount Suribachi was the defining image of the Allied victory in World War II, the most often viewed photograph of its time, and its photographer was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. The heroism and sacrifice of those Marines were never in doubt. “When dissent was a common virtue” describes the actions of three Marine Generals during the Vietnam War. There was no iconic… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 5

The Death of the Lone Ranger, USMC

Friday, October 5, 2018 8:01 PM

By

In 1933, during the depths of the Great Depression, the “March of the Swiss Soldiers” finale from the William Tell overture came blaring over the airwaves from radio station WXYZ in Detroit to announce the arrival of a new American hero. Station owner George Trendle wanted a show about a mysterious cowboy, so writer Fran Striker developed a character who was the sole survivor of a group of Texas Rangers ambushed by a gang. After being found near death and nursed back to health by the Indian Tonto, the Lone Ranger dons a mask and sets out on his horse… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 8

12 People You Didn't Know Were U.S. Marines

Thursday, March 8, 2018 10:18 PM

By

12. Rob Riggle The comedian and actor Rob Riggle—who appeared on Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show, and dozens of films, sitcoms, and commercials—retired as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve in 2013. His deployments included tours in Kosovo and Afghanistan. 11. Bea Arthur The late actress Bea Arthur enjoyed a successful career playing acerbic characters on the TV series Maude and The Golden Girls. During World War II, under her birth name Bernice Frankel, she served in the Marine Corps as a truck driver and typist. Oddly, in her later years she would deny that she… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 4

Views from Somalia

Tuesday, October 4, 2016 12:37 PM

By

On 3–4 October 1993, 19 U.S. servicemembers were killed and many more wounded in the Battle of Mogadishu—a raid on a Somali marketplace to capture two lieutenants of warlord Mohamed Farrah Hassan Aidid that went horribly wrong. United Nations Operations in Somalia had been ongoing since early 1992 in an effort to stabilize the region wracked by civil war, but the fallout from the mission, chronicled in Mark Bowden’s Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War, ultimately led to the reevaluation of the United Nations Operation in Somalia and to the eventual discontinuation of that international intervention. The instability… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Sep 2

Tales from a Tarawa Marine

Friday, September 2, 2016 3:05 PM

By

In the course of my duties as the oral historian for the U.S. Marine Corps History Division, I interviewed Marines, all ranks and all time periods. I was made aware of Lieutenant Colonel Roy H. Elrod in an unusual manner: through family friends from Muleshoe, Texas. This is where I grew up and, coincidentally, where Roy grew up, but about 30 years apart. Now Roy and I live within five miles of each other, but more than 1,500 miles from Muleshoe, in Fredericksburg, Virginia. I was quite impressed when I met Roy. Here he was 93 years old; he lived… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 1

John Bradley's Account of the Iwo Flag Raising

Friday, July 1, 2016 2:11 PM

By

In preparing each issue of Naval History, one of the staff’s regular stops is the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. During a visit there several years ago I came across an account by Pharmacist’s Mate Second Class John Bradley of his role in the famous Iwo Jima flag raising on Mount Suribachi—the subject of Joe Rosenthal’s immortal, iconic photograph, which was the basis for the Marine Corps War Memorial. When news broke questioning Bradley’s role in the flag raising—and presence in the photo—I remembered that account, the transcript of a Navy interview with the corpsman recorded less than three… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 4

On Naval History's Scope

Monday, January 4, 2016 11:17 AM

By

Twenty-five years. It’s hard to believe Operation Desert Storm was so long ago. Perhaps that’s because the United States seemingly has been at war in that part of the world ever since. Or maybe because images of the conflict’s high-tech U.S. weapons in action were so indelible. Like many of you, I clearly recall being glued to the TV for much of the conflict. Otto Kreisher, on the other hand, witnessed the war firsthand as a journalist accompanying the U.S. Marines into Kuwait. A former enlisted Leatherneck, Kreisher is the author of the January/February Naval History cover story about the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 11

Ripley at the Bridge

Wednesday, November 11, 2015 12:01 AM

By

As a young man I was fascinated by a tale from ancient Roman history that told of a warrior whose courage was beyond all reason, yet was inspirational as an ideal worth trying to live up to. It is a story, often recounted by Roman authors and later preserved for English literature in a poem by Lord Macaulay that tells us of an Etruscan army marching on Rome, headed for a bridge across the Tiber River that, unless destroyed, would give the enemy access to the capital city itself. Their van will be upon us Before the bridge goes down;… Read the rest of this entry »

 
« Older Entries