Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Nov 28

Unadilla-Class Gunboats

Wednesday, November 28, 2018 11:59 AM

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Lithograph of the USS Unadilla (1861) underway.

Did you know that today, on the 28th of November, 1863, the USS Chippewa convoyed the Army transports Monohansett and Mayflower up Skull Creek, South Carolina, on a reconnaissance mission? I don’t imagine the majority of folks do, unless they are American Civil War buffs, but I learned that particular fact perusing through today’s events in history, looking for a subject for my blog post. While the specifics of this mission (which was successful, by the by) aren’t the subject of my blog post today, looking into this event was the catalyst for what I will be covering: Unadilla-class gunboats…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 11

Pea Island Lifesaving Crew’s Daring Rescue – 11 October 1896

Thursday, October 11, 2018 11:01 AM

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Emblem of the United States Life Saving Service

The schooner E.S. Newman ran aground about two miles south of the Pea Island, North Carolina, life-saving station after losing it’s sails and drifting about 100 miles during a hurricane on October 11, 1896. Under the command of Keeper, Richard Etheridge, the crew of the station hitched mules to a beach cart and rushed towards the ship where the captain and eight others were clinging to the wreck.   A Lyle’s gun could not deploy a line to the victims so Etheridge ordered two surfmen to tie themselves together and swim through the heavy seas toward the wreck while carrying another line… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 5

The Death of the Lone Ranger, USMC

Friday, October 5, 2018 8:01 PM

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Death of Lone Ranger 1

In 1933, during the depths of the Great Depression, the “March of the Swiss Soldiers” finale from the William Tell overture came blaring over the airwaves from radio station WXYZ in Detroit to announce the arrival of a new American hero. Station owner George Trendle wanted a show about a mysterious cowboy, so writer Fran Striker developed a character who was the sole survivor of a group of Texas Rangers ambushed by a gang. After being found near death and nursed back to health by the Indian Tonto, the Lone Ranger dons a mask and sets out on his horse… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 24

Historic Site: Harbor View Memorial Park

Friday, August 24, 2018 2:46 PM

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USS Tennessee Memorial, Harbor View Memorial Park, San Pedro, CA

While we recall the wreck of the USS Memphis (ACR-10) which occurred on August 29, 1916 killing 43 crew members, let’s remember a lesser known tragedy that occurred aboard the ship when she was known by her original name, Tennessee.   Inscription: George Wood (-1908) Watertender U.S. A Reinhold (-1908) M.M. 2.C. S. W. Meek (-1908) F. 1.C. E. C. Boccs (-1908)F. 2.C. F. S. Maxfield (-1908)F. 2.C. J. P. A. Carroll (-1908)F. 2.C. E. J. Burns (-1908) C.P. Died Heroically at Their Stations, In Line of Duty, USS Tennessee (ACR-10), June, 1908, Erected by Shipmates

 
Jul 2

Women in Aviation: an Uplifting Tradition

Monday, July 2, 2018 3:22 PM

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(Photo: National Archives Catalog)

On the anniversary of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance, we remember the women who made female aviation possible. Eighty-one years ago today, Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific Ocean during an attempt to circumnavigate the globe. In a society where women’s capacities to physically and mentally cope with the rigors of aviation faced heavy scrutiny, Earhart overcame barriers and established new standards to pave the way for women in the field. After first flying in an airplane in 1920, she worked odd jobs to purchase her own aircraft and received an international pilot’s license in 1923. Earhart set about breaking altitude and… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jun 22

First SOSUS signal at Cape Hatteras – June 1962

Friday, June 22, 2018 3:21 PM

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A view of the Cape Hatteras lighthouse from the beach. (National Park Service)

I started to feel a little nostalgic when I found out that the first SOSUS signal of a Soviet diesel submarine was detected by the Cape Hatteras Naval Facility (NAVFAC) on June 26, 1962. Like many other women naval officers who launched their careers in the Cold War era, SOSUS was one of the few real ‘operational’ billets available to us, so we requested and got orders to the ‘Naval Facilities’ to begin our careers as watch officers for what was a secret but highly successful cold war antisubmarine warfare asset at the time. Our job was to monitor, detect, hold… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 24

Naval History News of Note

Thursday, May 24, 2018 11:36 PM

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John Glenn Navy Flight Helmet 1

  This week’s news stories concerning naval history:   The U.S. Navy helmet that John Glenn wore during the first supersonic transcontinental flight is up for auction. Glenn flew from Los Alamitos, California to NAS Floyd Bennett Field, New York at a record speed of 725.55 mph during Project Bullet. The success of the mission led to Glenn being selected for the Mercury program.   The museum ship USS Slater received a much-needed grant to repair the mast and hull. The Cannon-class destroyer escort was commissioned in 1944 and participated in Atlantic convoys. She was sold to Greece after the war… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 2

No Forgotten Fronts: From Classrooms to Combat

Monday, April 2, 2018 11:13 AM

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9781682472729_high res cover_Shapiro

My college classrooms are always full of veterans. That’s because San Diego is home to half a dozen military installations, including Naval Base San Diego, NAS North Island, the Naval Amphibious Base, and Marine Corps Air Station Miramar. Prior to World War II, the Naval Training Center on San Diego’s waterfront prepared tens of thousands of recruits for service, while less than ten miles away, San Diego State College was busy educating young men and women in the arts and sciences, and readying them for war. As the students began leaving for military service, one geography professor, Dr. Lauren Post,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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