Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Feb 14

Richard Wainwright: USS Maine survivor & supporter of the Naval Institute

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 12:22 PM

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1849-1926

  When the USS Maine exploded 120 years ago on February 15, 1898, Lieutenant Commander Richard Wainwright, one of the Naval Institute’s staunchest supporters, was the Maine’s executive officer. Fortunately, he survived. Wainwright’s numerous contributions to Proceedings magazine began as early as 1882. He continued writing and contributing to Proceedings until his final article, “The Dacia Dilemma”, was published in August 1925 not long before he passed in 1926. Wainwright explored a variety of topics including the Graydon torpedo thrower, Fleet Tactics, The Naval Defense of the United Kingdom, Navy Coast Signals, The Merchant Marine, Gun-Making, Search Curves, and Speed… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 6

Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate Carl Maxie Brashear, the U.S. Navy’s First African American Master Diver

Tuesday, February 6, 2018 12:01 AM

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Master Chief Boatswain's Mate Carl M. Brashear, USN (Ret.) (1931-2006)

Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate Carl Maxie Brashear (1931-2006) used a rare combination of grit, determination, and persistence to overcome formidable hurdles to become the first black master diver in the U.S. Navy. His race was an obstacle, as were his origin on a sharecropper’s farm in rural Kentucky and the modest amount of education he received there. But these were not his greatest challenges. He was held back by an even bigger factor: In 1966 his left leg was amputated just below the knee because he was badly injured on a salvage operation. After the amputation, the Navy sought to… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 10

January 10, 1943 – USS Trigger (SS-237) sinks Japanese destroyer Okikaze

Wednesday, January 10, 2018 12:28 PM

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The USS Trigger fresh from the builder's yard at Mare Island.

It was 75 years ago today, that the USS Trigger (SS-237)  torpedoed and sank the Japanese destroyer Okikaze. The following is a description of the event taken from the Trigger’s third war patrol report:

 
Aug 2

Frogmen

Wednesday, August 2, 2017 12:20 PM

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Frogmen

My dad wanted to be a Frogman when he grew up. Seeing how I thought his ambition growing up was to be Superman, I was puzzled. Then my dad explained. During the late 1950s and early ’60s, when I was 5 to 9 years old, there was a TV show called Sea Hunt, starring Lloyd Bridges. The main character was a scuba diver (and I think a former Navy frogman/member of an underwater demolition team (UDT)). Most of the action took place underwater.  It was one of my favorite shows. I liked it so much, I “played” Sea Hunt in… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 19

Admiral Kimmel and the Attack

Friday, May 19, 2017 2:59 PM

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Pacific Fleet Commander-in-Chief Admiral Husband Kimmel (U.S. Naval Institute Photo Archive)

  Beginning in December 2016, I began writing a series of monthly (approximately) “H-Grams” that go to all active-duty and retired Navy flag officers, and the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, with the expectation that they would be disseminated further to fleet Sailors, and with the acceptance that they would make their way “into the wild.” I did this with the approval of the Chief of Naval Operations and Director, Navy Staff to support the Navy’s “Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority” which includes a sub-task to “Know Our History.” My intent is to write them in a way… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Nov 29

The Hudson River Chain

Tuesday, November 29, 2016 12:27 PM

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Tom Martin (My Dad) 1971

  We sometimes forget our parents were not born adults. They were children and teenagers first, who did silly things. When it comes to my dad, Tom Martin, the man who must follow the arrows in a parking lot, it is hard to imagine him pulling a prank, especially during his U.S. Coast Guard Academy years. Each year at the Coast Guard Academy, the fourth-class (freshman) cadets pull pranks the night before the first home football game. So during my dad’s fourth-class year in 1971, he and some classmates set their sights high. The Coast Guard Academy is home to… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jun 20

A Gun to Counter the Dive Bomber

Monday, June 20, 2016 12:01 AM

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A gun crew practices on a quadruple 1.1-inch mount at Dam Neck Training Center Virginia. Note the large, cumbersome magazines. (National Archives)

The quadruple 1.1-inch machine cannon, affectionately known as the “Chicago Piano,” was the first medium-range antiaircraft gun adopted by the U.S. Navy.1 Engineered and built by the Naval Gun Factory during the Great Depression, it was designed specifically to combat dive bombers. The four-barreled weapon fired a one-pound explosive shell that was fused to explode on contact with the thin doped fabric that covered the wings of the era’s biplanes. The resulting shrapnel would tear through the wing, causing loss of control. The need to provide the Fleet with a new antiaircraft gun became evident in the late 1920s in… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 22

Life as a Dependent

Tuesday, March 22, 2016 12:01 AM

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“I say ‘we’ because don’t tell me wives don’t have [duty], too.”—Mary Smith, wife of Commander Roy Campbell Smith Jr., U.S. Navy

Our men and women in uniform are not the only ones who serve their country; the spouses and families of each service member do so as well. John Mason Jr., the former director of the U.S. Naval Institute’s oral history program, interviewed Frances Smalley Mitscher and Mary Taylor Alger Smith to get their side of Navy life in first half of the 20th century. Mary Smith grew up on the U.S. Naval Academy grounds, where she met her future husband, Roy Campbell Smith Jr., who was a midshipman. They married on 1 August 1912 when he was an ensign. Over… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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