Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Apr 2

Impact of the Writings of Captain Edward L. Beach Sr.

Thursday, April 2, 2020 12:01 AM

By

Rear Admiral Walter C Ansel, USN (Ret.)

  In this excerpt from his oral history, Read Admiral Ansel tells of how he was profoundly influenced to attend the Naval Academy and pursue a naval career by the writings of Captain Edward L. Beach Sr. — who, along with his son and namesake, is whom the Naval Institute’s headquarters, Beach Hall, is named after. Both Captain Beach Sr. and son Ned Beach were inextricably linked to the Institute throughout its history, and both embodied the Naval Institute ideal encoded in its insignia: the pen and the sword. A 1918 graduate of the Naval Academy, Admiral Ansel served on… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 3

Inchon Landing 15 September 1950

Tuesday, March 3, 2020 12:01 AM

By

Captain Glyn Jones, CHC, U.S. Navy (Ret.)

  In this audio selection from his oral history, Captain Jones serves up a vivid, you-are-there account of the Marines’ push through South Korea after the historic Inchon Landing in 1950, as one of three chaplains assigned to the large-scale invasion force. Jones graduated from Andover Newton Theological Seminary in 1940 and joined the Navy in 1942. His duties included: Third Marine Regiment in Samoa, New Zealand, Guadalcanal, Truk, Bougainville; station chaplain at Naval Air Station, Quonset Point, Rhode Island; First Marine Division, FMF Pac in Korea; senior chaplain, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island; director, Marine Corps Educational Center… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 21

The Evolution of Naval Wargames

Friday, February 21, 2020 2:05 PM

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  Naumachiae: Sea Battles in the Colosseum The Romans always enjoyed a good game, especially if it was extravagant and resulted in multiple gruesome deaths. Historical accounts from the reign of Emperor Titus detail spectacles known as naumachiae (Latin for “naval combat”) in which arenas such as the Coliseum were flooded and prisoners were then forced to reenact famous sea battles by fighting from scale-model ships. The easily bored Romans occasionally spiced up the games by added specially trained bulls that could fight in water. The Fred Jane Naval War Game In the 19th century, several games were produced for… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 14

Letters From Home

Friday, February 14, 2020 10:52 AM

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  On Valentines Day, I’m reminded of how much a nice long letter used to mean to me when I was stationed away from family and friends. Times have changed as text messages, email, FaceTime, Google Duo & social media have advanced the speed at which one can receive news from home. As a bit of nostalgia, I pulled some photos from the Naval Institute archive for you to enjoy. Letter writing is the only device for combining solitude with good company. ~Lord Byron What a wonderful thing is the mail, capable of conveying across continents a warm human hand-clasp…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 11

The Antiaircraft Fire Control ‘Shoebox’

Tuesday, February 11, 2020 12:01 AM

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In the spring of 1941, the staff of the fire-control section in the newly reorganized Bureau of Ordnance’s Research and Development Division was struggling with the problem of how to provide fire control for the heavier antiaircraft machine guns that were just entering production, such as the 40-mm Bofors and the 1.1-in machine cannon. Although a series of development contracts had been awarded to the traditional suppliers of fire-control directors, none of the devices submitted to date lent themselves to quantity production, none had proven to work, and all were deemed too difficult to maintain afloat. Unbeknown to anyone in… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 6

Reflections of ADM Stansfield Turner, USN (Ret.)

Thursday, February 6, 2020 12:01 AM

By

Admiral Stansfield Turner, U.S. Navy (Ret.)

  In this excerpt, Admiral Stansfield Turner reflects on his interactions with Admiral Elmo Zumwalt and Zumwalt’s service as CNO. After growing up in the Chicago area, Turner spent a year at Amherst College prior to entering the U.S. Naval Academy in 1943. His class of 1947 graduated a year early because the academy’s curriculum was shortened in World War II. After brief service in the escort carrier USS Palau (CVE-122) and the light cruiser USS Dayton (CL-105), he was in England as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University from 1947 to 1950. In 1966, he attended the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 24

How the Navy Got a Hit Recruiting Video From Van Halen

Friday, January 24, 2020 5:06 AM

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In 1986, the band Van Halen was in transition. After scoring a major commercial success with the album 1984 that included their first #1 single “Jump”, the antics and overbearing personality of lead singer David Lee Roth had become too much for the rest of the band and they decided to part ways. Critics questioned if Van Halen could continue without the charismatic Roth serving as the frontman. The announcement that the “Red Rocker” Sammy Hagar would be Roth’s replacement was met with mixed reactions from fans. So it was a surprise to many when 5150, Van Halen’s first album… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jan 7

Dispelling a USS Liberty Theory

Tuesday, January 7, 2020 12:01 AM

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The role of the diesel electric submarine USS Amberjack (SS-522) during the June 1967 Six-Day War–and specifically at the time of the Israeli attack on the spy ship USS Liberty (AGTR-5) on 8 June–has elicited considerable interest from many quarters. There have been controversial interpretations of events associated with the Amberjack’s movements, but what actually happened is significant because, in some cases, theoretical misrepresentations of events have stained the honor of a U.S. submarine. In 1967, U.S. national strategic interests drove the approach by President Lyndon B. Johnson and his key cabinet members and national security advisers to the growing… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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