Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Jun 4

Thank You

Thursday, June 4, 2020 11:57 AM

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Thank you for being a faithful reader of the Naval History Blog. As of June 1, the Naval Institute will be dedicating more resources to Naval History magazine’s digital presence, and we will be sunsetting the Naval History Blog. Posts will remain available on the blog until July 1, and after that, much of the content will eventually transfer to Naval History online. In addition, we will be updating the online magazine 2–3 times a week with more of the insightful and engaging content you love, available outside of our subscriber-only firewall. For more information about the transition, or to… Read the rest of this entry »

 
May 12

Asian/Pacific Islander American Month

Tuesday, May 12, 2020 10:57 AM

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This month is Asian American/Pacific Islander month and as we celebrate their significant contributions to the United States Navy, there are many fascinating stories of individuals who exemplify the best of us. One riveting story is that of Susan Ahn Cuddy. Mrs. Cuddy lived a long and remarkable life, and was honored by Los Angeles County as a “100 year old Korean American Pioneer and Patriot” by the declaration of “Susan Ahn Cuddy Day” on March 10th, 2015. According to the Los Angeles County website, Susan Ahn Cuddy was born in 1915 to the first married couple to immigrate from… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Feb 6

Reflections of ADM Stansfield Turner, USN (Ret.)

Thursday, February 6, 2020 12:01 AM

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Admiral Stansfield Turner, U.S. Navy (Ret.)

  In this excerpt, Admiral Stansfield Turner reflects on his interactions with Admiral Elmo Zumwalt and Zumwalt’s service as CNO. After growing up in the Chicago area, Turner spent a year at Amherst College prior to entering the U.S. Naval Academy in 1943. His class of 1947 graduated a year early because the academy’s curriculum was shortened in World War II. After brief service in the escort carrier USS Palau (CVE-122) and the light cruiser USS Dayton (CL-105), he was in England as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University from 1947 to 1950. In 1966, he attended the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 27

The Foundation of the WAVES

Tuesday, August 27, 2019 9:47 AM

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As a student of history, I know that examining an organization’s foundations can offer better understanding of and appreciation for that organization. For that reason, there is much to gain from reflecting on the foundation of the WAVES and what it took to get this organization so integral to the United States’ success in World War II off the ground. The Navy was not the first military branch to establish an auxiliary corps consisting chiefly of women. In 1941, Representative Edith Nourse Rogers of Massachusetts presented a bill to congress to establish WAAC, the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps, and after… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Oct 11

Pea Island Lifesaving Crew's Daring Rescue – 11 October 1896

Thursday, October 11, 2018 11:01 AM

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The schooner E.S. Newman ran aground about two miles south of the Pea Island, North Carolina, life-saving station after losing it’s sails and drifting about 100 miles during a hurricane on October 11, 1896. Under the command of Keeper, Richard Etheridge, the crew of the station hitched mules to a beach cart and rushed towards the ship where the captain and eight others were clinging to the wreck.   A Lyle’s gun could not deploy a line to the victims so Etheridge ordered two surfmen to tie themselves together and swim through the heavy seas toward the wreck while carrying another line… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Apr 2

No Forgotten Fronts: From Classrooms to Combat

Monday, April 2, 2018 11:13 AM

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My college classrooms are always full of veterans. That’s because San Diego is home to half a dozen military installations, including Naval Base San Diego, NAS North Island, the Naval Amphibious Base, and Marine Corps Air Station Miramar. Prior to World War II, the Naval Training Center on San Diego’s waterfront prepared tens of thousands of recruits for service, while less than ten miles away, San Diego State College was busy educating young men and women in the arts and sciences, and readying them for war. As the students began leaving for military service, one geography professor, Dr. Lauren Post,… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 20

Celebrating Women's History Month

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 12:24 PM

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  I’ve enjoyed reading the oral history of Captain Winifred Quick Collins during Women’s History Month. Captain Collins dedicated her career to the advancement of women in the Navy, and her reminiscences reveal the many obstacles she overcame as we progressed toward a more inclusive Navy. Collins was among the first officers accepted when the WAVES were established in 1942; one of the first female officers commissioned in the regular Navy, which happened in 1948; and at the top of her profession as the only woman line captain at the end of her career. She was selected for the Navy experience as the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Mar 8

H.H. Jalbert

Tuesday, March 8, 2016 12:01 AM

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One of the perks of being a photo researcher is getting to interact with professionals at museums and news agencies around the world. To find inspiration for my blog posts, I scour the USNI Archives for forgotten photo albums or unusual images. In January I discovered an album belonging to H. H. Jalbert of the Naval Air Station in Queenstown, Ireland, during World War I. It appeared to be missing three photos, which had been kept by the donor D. M. Jalbert—a family member, perhaps? Later that month, I found a collection of photos of the Naval Oil Reserve in… Read the rest of this entry »

 
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