Aug 4

The U. S. Life Saving Service

Saturday, August 4, 2012 1:00 AM

By

August 4, 1790     Creation of the United States Coast Guard   One of the many responsibilities of today’s Coast Guard is that of saving the lives of those in danger on the sea. In the Sring 1992 issue of Naval History, Lieutenant Commander Robert V. Hulse of the Coast Guard vividly describes the typical duties of a surfman at a life saving station in the 1930s, shortly after the U. S. Life Saving Service and the Revenue Cutter Service merged together to form the Coast Guard. Hulse’s article reflects nostalgically on his own experience in his service: In… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 1

The Birth of the Aircraft Carrier

Wednesday, August 1, 2012 9:20 AM

By

THE BIRTH OF THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER (from USNI Proceedings Vol 93/No 4/Whole No 770) by W. T. Adams “Look! What’s that?” The gray-clad soldier pointed down the Potomac River toward a group of ships just rounding a bend. “Look just beyond the last one.” “I’ve never seen anything like that before,” his companion answered. “We’d better tell the captain right away!” On that August day in 1862, as the Confederate lookouts ran back to report, they knew they had sighted something unusual, but they little realized that the ships rounding the bend were the Civil War’s most incredible armada-the first… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Aug 1

Operation Sea Orbit

Wednesday, August 1, 2012 9:18 AM

By

On July 31, 1964, three nuclear-powered Navy ships left Norfolk, Virginia, to begin their journey around the globe without refueling. The following account of Operation Sea Orbit’s success was published in the March 1965 issue of Proceedings. OPERATION SEA ORBIT By Rear Admiral Bernard M. Strean, U.S. Navy, Commander, Task Force One The U. S. Navy is an old hand at “showing the flag,” at conducting good will visits, and at entertaining foreign dignitaries on board ship. The Navy is also an old hand at conducting test and evaluation cruises, and at establishing records. But rarely does the Navy have… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 26

Naval Reserves in the Korean War

Thursday, July 26, 2012 3:21 PM

By

On July 27, 1953, the Korean War Armistice Agreement was signed at Panmunjon, Korea, and the Korean cease-fire went into effect at 10:00 PM, ending three years of combat. The following article, published in the July 1952 issue of Proceedings, gives an account of what it was like to be a part of a Naval reserve group in the Korean war. STANDBY SQUADRON By LIEUTENANT W. H. VERNOR, JR., U. S. Naval Reserve   IF you’ve ever driven between the Texas cities of Fort Worth and Dallas on a Sunday morning, chances are you’ve seen some of the rugged, old Navy… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 24

Operation Forager

Tuesday, July 24, 2012 10:17 AM

By

On July 24, 1944, the Naval Task Force landed Marines on Tinian. After victory in the Battle of Saipan from June 15 to July 9, Tinian, which was 3.5 miles south of Saipan, was the next logical step in the U.S. strategy of island hopping. Tinian was Phase III of Operation Forager, which began with the capture of Saipan (Phase I) and the battle for the liberation of Guam (II), which was raging even as the Marines were approaching Tinian. Submarines were used to destroy enemy forces approaching the islands , clearing the way for the beach landing. The following… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 23

Richard Dale Strikes Barbary Pirates

Monday, July 23, 2012 9:47 AM

By

July 23, 1801 Commodore Richard Dale blockades Tripoli in America’s first foreign war. In the December 1937 issue of Proceedings, Lieutenant Felix Howland wrote about the American blockade of Tripoli during 1801 to 1802, examining the popular conception that the blockade had been a success. Howland’s article highlighted the necessity of vigilantly maintaining the blockade, and emphasized the implications of failing to do so: On May 14, 1801, Tripoli declared war against the United States. Shortly thereafter an American squadron under the command of Commodore Richard Dale appeared in the Mediterranean, and on July 23, 1801, Mr. William Eaton, the… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 23

Sealab I

Monday, July 23, 2012 9:36 AM

By

Sealab I was the first experimental underwater habitat developed by the Navy to research the psychological and physiological strain of extended periods spent living and working underwater. Two more Sealab experiments followed the first, providing information that helped advance the science of deep sea diving and rescue. The following article, published in the February 1965 issue of Proceedings, discusses the goals of Sealab 1, and the results of the ten day experiment. SEALAB I by Lieutenant Commander Don Groves, U.S. Naval Reserve An odd looking, 40-foot vessel, equipped with pontoon-shaped appendages, was launched from the navy’s oceanographic research tower, Argus Island, on… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 18

John Paul Jones Remembered

Wednesday, July 18, 2012 8:15 AM

By

The United State’s first well-known naval fighter died 220 years ago, on July 18, 1792. Originally published in the July 1947 issue of Proceedings to mark the bicentennial of his birth, the following article outlines the life of John Paul Jones and his contributions to the Navy. THE BICENTENNIAL OF JOHN PAUL JONES By DR. LINCOLN LORENZ VIEWED from the bicentennial of his birth, John Paul Jones has even greater eminence now as a leader of the American Navy at its beginning than he won at the time of his incomparable triumph in the battle of the Bonhomme Richard with… Read the rest of this entry »