Jul 23

Sealab I

Monday, July 23, 2012 9:36 AM

By

Sealab I was the first experimental underwater habitat developed by the Navy to research the psychological and physiological strain of extended periods spent living and working underwater. Two more Sealab experiments followed the first, providing information that helped advance the science of deep sea diving and rescue. The following article, published in the February 1965 issue of Proceedings, discusses the goals of Sealab 1, and the results of the ten day experiment. SEALAB I by Lieutenant Commander Don Groves, U.S. Naval Reserve An odd looking, 40-foot vessel, equipped with pontoon-shaped appendages, was launched from the navy’s oceanographic research tower, Argus Island, on… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 18

John Paul Jones Remembered

Wednesday, July 18, 2012 8:15 AM

By

The United State’s first well-known naval fighter died 220 years ago, on July 18, 1792. Originally published in the July 1947 issue of Proceedings to mark the bicentennial of his birth, the following article outlines the life of John Paul Jones and his contributions to the Navy. THE BICENTENNIAL OF JOHN PAUL JONES By DR. LINCOLN LORENZ VIEWED from the bicentennial of his birth, John Paul Jones has even greater eminence now as a leader of the American Navy at its beginning than he won at the time of his incomparable triumph in the battle of the Bonhomme Richard with… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 13

Exploring The Antarctic

Friday, July 13, 2012 9:52 AM

By

On July 13, 1939, RADM Richard Byrd was appointed as commanding officer of the 1939-1941 Antarctic exploration. This was Byrd’s third Antarctic expedition, and the first one that had the official backing of the U.S. Government. In honor of his work, and the work done by many others who braved the cold and ice, here is a brief history of American Antarctic exploration, originally published in the November 1961 issue of Proceedings. Charting of an Unknown Land: The Antarctic Continent By SCOT MAcDONALD There is a suspicion among some cartographers that Christopher Columbus carried with him on his first trip… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 3

Adventures of Old Glory

Tuesday, July 3, 2012 12:46 PM

By

A brief American flag history from 1777-1927 is presented in celebration of Independence Day. In the March 1927 issue of Proceedings, an article was published with a chronology of some “firsts” for the American flag. Another “first” not included in the following article: On July 4, 1777, John Paul Jones and the crew of the Sloop-of-War Ranger hoisted the first “Stars and Stripes” flag to be flown on board a continental warship. Adventures 0f “Old Glory” By William E. Beard The flag of the United States, adopted June 14, 1777, was thereafter in the Revolution thirteen stars and thirteen stripes. The War… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jul 1

Consolidation of the Lighthouse Service with the Coast Guard: July 1, 1939

Sunday, July 1, 2012 1:00 AM

By

CONSOLIDATION OF THE LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE WITH THE COAST GUARD (from USNI Proceedings Vol 66/No1/Whole No 443) By ROBERT H. MACY ON JULY 1, 1939, two of the oldest government maritime services were combined-the U. S. Coast Guard and the U. S. Lighthouse Service. The former has been under the Treasury Department and the latter in recent years was a bureau of the Department of Commerce. Officially, this merger is part of the President’s Reorganization Plan No. II, promulgated under the Reorganization Act of 1939 (Public No. 19, 76th Congress). Under this Act, “the duties, responsibilities, and functions of the Commissioner… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jun 26

U.S.S. Scorpion Artifact Vignette: Surgical Scissors

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 8:49 AM

By

“It is no small presumption to dismember the image of God.” -John Woodall (1556-1643) The Naval History and Heritage Command’s Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) has been conducting a multi-year investigation of a shipwreck in the Patuxent River believed to be War of 1812 vessel USS Scorpion. During the 2011 field season, several artifacts were recovered from the vessel’s hold including a pair of surgical scissors, SCORP-2011-53 (Figure 2). Previous investigation of the shipwreck in 1979 yielded another pair of surgical scissors, 99-69-AE (Figure 1). UAB has been conducting ongoing research to better understand the specific medical uses of these artifacts…. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jun 26

The Navy Sails the Inland Seas

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 7:29 AM

By

Today marks the 53rd anniversary of the formal opening of the Saint Lawrence Seaway to seagoing ships. The Seaway is a 2,432 mile long international waterway consisting of a system of canals, dams, and locks. It provides passage for large oceangoing vessels into central North America, and has created a fourth seacoast accessible to the industrial and agricultural heartland of North America. To celebrate the opening of the Seaway, President Eisenhower and Queen Elizabeth II, along with twenty-eight Naval vessels, cruised from the Atlantic to the Great Lakes. 1,040 midshipmen, including the entire third class of midshipmen at the Naval… Read the rest of this entry »

 
Jun 21

Okinawa Operation

Thursday, June 21, 2012 9:51 AM

By

The Battle of Okinawa was the largest amphibious assault in the Pacific War of World War II. On June 21, 1945, after 82 days of battle, the Japanese troops were defeated. This was not intended to be the final major battle of World War II, only the staging ground for the Allied invasion of Japan. The ferocity of the fighting on Okinawa, combined with the massive number of casualties, forced American strategists to seek alternative means for ending the war, as the destruction on Okinawa would surely have paled in comparison to any invasion of the Japanese home islands. The following… Read the rest of this entry »